LTER All Scientists’ Meeting | Next Generation Synthesis: Successes and Strategies

LTER All Scientists’ Meeting | Next Generation Synthesis: Successes and Strategies

Workshop: Integration of the Environmental Sciences, Arts, and Humanities Across the LTER Network

 

Xavier Cortada, Diatom, archival ink on aluminum, 36in x 18in, 2014 (edition 1 of 5).

 

The integration of environmental science, arts, and humanities (eSAH) is flourishing across the LTER network, where it is being applied to enhance outreach/education activities as well as fundamental inquiry with the aspirational goal of helping society overcome the social-ecological grand challenges of today.

During this workshop organized by Bonanza Creek LTER’s Dr. Mary Beth Leigh ( University of Alaska Fairbanks), scientists will:

a) share examples of varying eSAH activities from across the LTER network through brief presentations from artists, scientists, and organizers,

b) report on research assessing the impacts of eSAH activities on audiences and their value to LTER,

c) analyze the range and extent of interdisciplinary integration currently being achieved through different programmatic models, and

d) develop an action plan for organizing, communicating, and expanding the growing network of LTER eSAH programs.

Xavier Cortada will serve as special guest artist/speaker to present on his work as artist in residence at the following LTER sites:

  • Florida Coastal Everglades LTER (Florida)
  • H J Andrews LTER (Oregon)
  • Hubbard Brook LTER (New Hampshire)

 

Native Flags: 9th Annual Earth Day Celebration in every Miami-Dade County public school

On April 7th, 2010, students from Filer Middle School in Hialeah planted a sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera) and Native Flag on campus and adopted their own buttonwood and firebush trees/flags to plant at their homes. See www.nativeflags.org. 

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Celebrates Earth Day 2018

At its meeting of February 21, 2018 the School Board approved Board Item H-4 proffered by School Board Member Perla Tabares Hantman, endorsing April 22, 2018 as Earth Day in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

For the ninth year in a row, we are proud to again partner with local artist Xavier Cortada and local organizations on an Earth Day project through which all schools will be able to plant a native tree on campus, together with the symbolic posting of a land reclamation flag. Other partners in this native tree canopy enhancement project include Florida International University College of Arts, Sciences & Education (CASE)│School of Environment, Arts and Society (SEAS), FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA), FIU Libraries│Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), Pinecrest Gardens, Frost Science, and the Deering Estate. In addition, students will be afforded the opportunity to interpret Earth Day by designing their own flag.

Celebrations are scheduled as follows on Thursday, April 19, 2018 at two featured public schools:

  • Gulfstream Elementary
    20900 SW 97th Avenue
    Cutler Bay, Florida  33189
    Phone: (305) 235- 6811
    Time: 9:00 am
  • Citrus Grove Elementary
    2121 NW 5th Street
    Miami, Florida 33125
    Phone: (305) 642-4141
    Time: 1:30 pm

Starting on April 19th photos of the tree planting and flag posting activities can be uploaded by the schools at: http://nativeflags.org/participant-upload/

For more information on this year’s Earth Day celebration or the land reclamation project go to www.NativeFlags.org or call 305-995-4646.

 

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags: North Pole,” 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation” during Power of Arts Museum at Sweetwater

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation”

 

 

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007

Longitudinal Installation,” created by Cortada a decade ago as part of his NSF Antarctic Artists and Writers Program residency in Antarctica, will be performed by Sweetwater Elementary School students on May 24th at 7 pm.  The performance and activity is co-presented by the Reclamation Projects with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

Participate by following these steps:

1. Find a group of 24 people to perform the Longitudinal Installation ritual with and engage in the performance.
Click here to download instructions.

2. Document the performance with photos and video.

3. Upload photo on www.facebook.com/longitudinalinstallation

4.  Add the “25th quote.”

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007 (Listen: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.xaviercortada.com/resource/resmgr/longitudinal_installation_no.mp3)

24 Global Voices

longitude11x17_graphicThese quotes taken from newspapers across 24 time zones that talking about the impact of climate change on that individual’s life. After Xavier Cortada completed the Longitudinal Installation at the South Pole, he walked to the 0 degree longitude, the prime meridian, and walked clockwise around the pole. He stopped at each shoe to recite each of the following quotes:

 

0°, Spain:
“There may be a move of wineries into the Pyrenees in the future.”
— Xavier Sort, technical director of Miguel Torres Wineries.

15° E, Switzerland:
“Losses to insurers from environmental events have risen exponentially over the past 30 years, and are expected to rise even more rapidly still.”
— Pamela Heck, Insurance Industry Expert.

30° E, Zimbabwe:
“We used to be able to grow everything we want but that has all changed.”
— Matsapi Nyathi, Grandmother.

45° E, Turkey:
“We are helpless. We’re trying to rescue trapped people while also trying to evacuate flood waters that have inundated hundreds of houses.”
— Muharrem Ergul, Mayor, Beykoz district of Istanbul.

60° E, Iran:
“More than 90 percent of our wetlands have completely dried up.”
— Alamdar Alamdari, environmental researcher, Fars Province.

75° E, Maldives:
“In the worst case scenario, we’ll have to move.”
— Foreign Ministry spokesman Ahmed Shaheed.

90° E, Tibet, China:
“The Sherpas of Khumbu may not know everything, but they are suffering the consequences of the people’s greed. We mountain people should be careful and take precautions. If we don’t save Khumbu today our fresh water will dry up and the problem will be impossible to solve in the future.”
— Ngawang Tenzing Jangpo, the Abbot of Tengboche monastery.

105° E, Borneo, Indonesia:
“There’s been no rain, it’s horrible. The governor’s office has instructed schools and offices to close until further notice.”
— Hidayat, government official.

120° E, Philippines:
“The disaster covered almost every corner of this province – rampaging floods, falling trees, damaged houses. It happened very rapidly and many people did not expect this because they haven’t experienced mud flows in those areas before.”
— Fernando Gonzalez, governor of Albay province.

135° E, Japan:
“It’s no exaggeration to say that Japan faces a critical situation when describing the rapid decline of marine supply in its domestic waters that is linked to seaweed loss. Tengusa (seaweed) provides food for marine species.”
— Tomohiro Takase, head of the fisheries department at the Hachijojima municipality.

150° E, Great Barrier Reef, Australia:
“In 20 years’ time, bleaching is highly likely to be annual and that will cause shallow-water corals to be in decline. We need to start working out how we can help people who rely on it for their income. It’s really quite a stunning fact.”
— Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, director of the Centre for Marine Studies at the University of Queensland.

165° E, Micronesia:
“We have nowhere to go.”
— Ben Namakin, Environmental Educator.

180°, Tuvalu: “Tuvalu is the first victim of global warming.”
— Koloa Talake, former prime minister.

165° W , Niue: “Yesterday morning we woke up to a scene of so much devastation, it was just unbelievable. Cyclone Heta was just so fast, furious and ruthless.”
— Cecelia Talagi, Government Secretary.

150° W, Alaska, USA:
“We are at a crossroads. . . Is it practical to stand and fight our Mother Ocean? Or do we surrender and move?”
— Shishmaref Mayor Edith Vorderstrasse.

135° W, Yukon, Canada:
“The weather is really unpredictable and the ice freezes much later and breaks up earlier. There are more incidents of hunters falling through the ice.”
— Kik Shappa, Hunter, Griese Fiord, Canada.

120° W Nunavut, Canada:
“Our cultural heritage is at stake here. We are an adaptable people. We have over the millennium been able to adapt to incredible circumstances. But I think adaptability has its limits. If the ice is not forming, how else does one adapt to seasons that are not as they used to be when the whole environment is changing underneath our feet, literally?”
— Sheila Watt-Cloutier, president of the circumpolar conference.

105° W, Colorado, USA:
“In Colorado, climate change means less snow, less water, more wildfires, less biodiversity and less economic opportunity, as there is less water available for development.”
— Stephen Saunders, president, Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.

90° W, Nicaragua:
“I closed my eyes and prayed to God.”
— Mariana González, Hurricane Mitch survivor.

75° W, Peru:
“I tell my wife the day that mountain loses its snow, we will have to move out of the valley.”
— Jose Ignacio Lambarri, farmer, Urubamba Valley.

60° W, Argentina:
“The flooding has forced us to redesign routes. We thought it would be for a short period of time, but it has been almost six years.”
— Carlos Avellaneda, manager of a trucking company.

45° W, Brazil:
“I am very frightened. One thing goes wrong, and the entire system follows.”
— Jair Souto, Mayor of Manaquiri.

30° W, Greenland:
“They tell us that we must not eat mattak [whale blubber], but this is all we know. Eating Inughuit food makes us who we are, and anyway we have nothing else to eat!”
— Tekummeq, Town of Qaanaaq.

15° W, Maurtitania:
“We are only eating one meal a day. When there is not enough food, it is the young and the old that get fed first.”
— Fatimitu Mint Eletou, Bouchamo.


Native Flags: 8th Annual Earth Day Celebration in every Miami-Dade public school

 

On April 20th, 2017, MDCPS School Board Chair Larry Feldman helps Miami Sunset Senior High School students plant a live oak on their campus.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Celebrates Earth Day 2017

At its meeting of February 15, 2017 the School Board approved Board Item H-4 proffered by School Board Member Perla Tabares Hantman, endorsing April 22, 2017 as Earth Day in Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

For the eighth year in a row, we are proud to again partner with local artist Xavier Cortada and local organizations on an Earth Day project through which all schools will be able to plant a native tree on campus, together with the symbolic posting of a land reclamation flag. Other partners in this native tree canopy enhancement project include FIU College of Arts, Sciences & Education│School of Environment, Arts and Society, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts, FIU Libraries│Digital Library of the Caribbean, Pinecrest Gardens, Frost Science, and the Deering Estate. In addition, students will be afforded the opportunity to interpret Earth Day by designing their own flag.

Starting on April 22nd photos of the tree planting and flag posting activities can be uploaded by the schools at: http://nativeflags.org/participate/upload/

For more information on this year’s Earth Day celebration or the land reclamation project go to www.NativeFlags.org or call 305-995-4646.

 

Celebrations are scheduled for Thursday April 20th, 2017 as follows:

 

8:30 am Ceremony –      Joella C. Good Elementary School

                                                6350 ZNW 188th Terrace

                                                Miami, Florida 33015

                                                Phone: 305-625-2008

10:30 am Ceremony –     Miami Sunset Senior High School

                                                13125 SW 72 Street

                                                Miami, Florida 33183

                                                Phone: 305-385-4255

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags: North Pole,” 2008.

 

 

 

Leaf Summit: Native Flags Call to Action


Growing Our Tree Canopy Through Research Driven Solutions

The premier exchange on trees in Miami-Dade County featuring best practices from green cities, highlights from the Miami-Dade Urban Tree Canopy Assessment, insights on achieving Tree City/Tree Campus USA, tips on how to get trees to thrive, cutting edge research on the value of trees in Miami, Crown Canopy Award winner and the unveiling of the County’s online tree canopy tool. Elected officials, planners, landscape architects, public works employees, city administrators, educators, arborists, advocates, community leaders and members of public are welcome!

Agenda
8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Registration and Coffee 

9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Welcome

Neat Streets Miami’s Street Tree Matching Grant Award Announcement 
Grant awards to partner communities planting native or Florida-friendly trees on Miami-Dade’s corridors and gateways.

9:15 a.m. – 12 noon  Morning Sessions

Why Not Planting Trees Could Be Killing Your Community
The impact of trees on your community’s health and economy

Making Your Community Clamor for Trees
How to market trees in your community

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Networking Break


Putting Your Tree Research To Work

Miami-Dade County Urban Tree Canopy Assessment and Action Plan

Arming your Community with Green Infrastructure
Planting trees as a sea level rise solution
Crown Canopy Leadership Award

To an individual who has dedicated their career to growing Miami-Dade’s tree canopy

Native Flags Call to Action
Xavier Cortada (www.nativeflags.org)

12 noon  – Lunch in Panther Square

1:00 p.m. – Afternoon Sessions

Getting the Most Green Out of Your New and Existing Tree Inventory 
From tree selection and planting to maintenance, biodiversity and pollinators 
Learn From Leaders Putting Trees In the Ground: You Can Do it!
Municipal/Non-Profit Best Practices Lightning Round

Interactive Activity
Developing a multi-pronged approach to tackling our lowest tree canopy 

3:00 p.m. – Summit Conclusion

30 minute Optional Biscayne Bay Campus Tours (must sign up in advance)
Discovering FIU’s tree assets and tackling invasive species

Costs
$20 Pre-Sale Tickets – Pre-registration closes March 20, 2017
$30 at the Door
$5 Student Tickets with discount code

An Emotional Lexicon for Climate Change: WONDER, DENIAL, DISAPPOINTMENT, GRIEF, and HOPE

fragile habitat vizcaya

house-gardens-and-collections-landing-page

AN EMOTIONAL LEXICON FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

6:30PM 

WONDER, DENIAL, DISAPPOINTMENT, GRIEF, AND HOPE

 6:30PM – Reception, Event at 7:00PM

Vizcaya Museum & Gardens.

Reflect with local environmental humanities scholars on how arts and culture can help us understand the feelings we might have as we think about climate change.

 

A PUBLIC EVENT SERIES
BRINGING MIAMI TOGETHER TO
DISCUSS OUR FUTURE
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Organized by the Department of History of the Green School of International and Public Affairs, Florida International University in collaboration with HistoryMiami Museum, The Kampong, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, The Wolfsonian-FIU, Miami Dade County Public Schools’ Department of Social Sciences, the FIU Green Library Digital Collections Center, and Catalyst Miami

Made possible in part by a major grant from the Humanities in the Public Square Initiative of The National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating 50 Years of Excellence

Explore the challenges Miami faces from climate change through culture and history. Join nationally recognized scholars and local environmentalists for stories about our connections to this unique and fragile landscape. How can we come together to imagine our future and prioritize what is most valuable, just, and worthy of preservation?

For more information about the NEH-funded Ecohumanities for Cities in Crisis Event Series, please see ecohumanities.fiu.edu