Whatcom Museum presents “Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity”

“Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity”
Cortada’s Reclamation Project to be featured in group exhibition

September 8, 2018 – January 6, 2019; Lightcatcher

Curated by Barbara Matilsky, Curator of Art

Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity presents 80 works of art in all media, from rare books to cutting-edge video, that span the 19th through 21st centuries. It highlights artists who celebrate biodiversity’s exquisite complexity, interpret natural and human-induced extinctions of plants and animals, and focus on endangered species from diverse ecosystems. The exhibition explores art’s historic role in raising public awareness about the human activities that threaten habitats. Weaving together art, natural science, and conservation, Endangered Speciesalso features creative solutions by ecological artists who revitalize habitats and reconnect people to the rich tapestry of life.

Endangered Species highlights an international group of 52 artists who celebrate biodiversity’s beauty, interpret natural and human-induced extinctions of plants and animals, and focus on species from diverse ecosystems under stress. It also includes the work of artists who spotlight the human activities that threaten biodiversity alongside projects that revitalize habitats and reconnect people to the rich tapestry of life.

The exhibition spotlights five thematic concepts: Celebrating Biodiversity’s Beauty and Complexity: From Landscapes to Microscopic Imagery, Mammoths and Dinosaurs: Interpreting Natural Extinction, Portraits of Loss: Extinction by Human Actions, Endangered Species: Plants and Animals on the Edge of SurvivalAt the Crossroads: Destruction or Preservation of Biodiversity.

Endangered Species has been organized with the intent of impacting public discourse about biodiversity while advancing the artist’s pivotal role in building awareness. By tracing links between contemporary and earlier artists, the exhibition examines art’s contribution to an enduring cultural legacy of nature conservation. Featured artists are listed below.

Major funding for the exhibition and catalogue has been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts and The Norcliffe Foundation with additional support from the City of Bellingham,  Whatcom Museum Foundation and Advocates, Alexandre Gallery, and Heritage Bank. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.

Ernst Haeckel (German, 1834-1919); Reef-forming coral with six-fold symmetry, from the book, Art Forms in Nature (Hexacoralla, Kunstformen der Natur), 1904; Lithographic and halftone print. Courtesy of Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering and Technology, Kansas City, MO.

 

Featured Artists:

Julie Andreyev and Simon Lysander Overstall; Canadian, b. 1962 and 1969

Sara Angelucci; Canadian, b. 1962

John James Audubon; American, 1785 – 1851

Brandon Ballengée; American, b. 1974

William P.C. Barton; American, 1786 – 1856

Antoine Louis Barye; French, 1796 – 1875

Daniel Beltrà; American and Spanish, b. 1964

Nick Brandt; British, b. 1964

Edward Burtynsky; Canadian, b. 1955

George Catlin; American, 1796 – 1872

Catherine Chalmers; American, b. 1957

David Chancellor; British, b. 1961

Xavier Cortada; American, b. 1964

Mark Dion; American, b. 1961

Dornith Doherty; American, b. 1957

Michael Felber; American, b. England, 1946

Madeline von Foerster; American, b. 1973

Nicholas Galanin; Tlinget/Aleut, b. 1979

Penelope Gottlieb; American, b. 1952

Ernst Haeckel; German, 1834 – 1919

Martin Johnson Heade; American, 1819 – 1904

Patricia Johanson; American, b. 1940

Chris Jordan; American, b. 1963

Harri Kallio; American, b. Finnish, 1970

Sanna Kannisto; Finnish, b. 1974

Darius and Tabitha Kinsey; American, 1869 – 1945 and 1875 – 1963

Isabella Kirkland; American, b. 1954

Charles Knight; American, 1874 – 1953

Adam Kuby; American, b. 1961

Garth Lenz; Canadian

David Liittschwager; American, b. 1961

John Martin; British, 1789 – 1854

Courtney Mattison; American, b. 1985

Daniel McCormick and Mary A. O’Brien; American, b. 1950 and 1952

Susan Middleton; American, b. 1948

David W. Miller; American, b. 1957

Macoto Murayama; Japanese, b. 1984

Edouard Riou; French, 1833 – 1900

Alexis Rockman; American, b. 1962

Christy Rupp; American, b. 1949

Joel Sartore; American, b. 1962

Preston Singletary; American Tlingit, b. 1963

Brian Skerry; American, b. 1961

Carl Strüwe; German, 1898 – 1888

Jason deCaires Taylor; British, b. 1974

Fred Tomaselli; American, b. 1956

Tom Uttech; American, b. 1942

Roman Vishniac; American, b. Russia, 1897 – 1990

Jason Walker; American, b. 1973

Andy Warhol; American, 1928 – 1987

Yang Yongliang; Chinese, b. 1980

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun; Canadian First Nations (Coast Salish and Okanagan), b. 1957

Pinecrest Gardens Hibiscus Gallery presents: “80.15 W”

Xavier Cortada “(80.15 W:) Hawksbill Sea Turtle” Archival ink on paper (generated from drawings created on 11” x 8.5” carbon paper) Signed, numbered, limited edition (edition of 5), 16” x 12” 2010

80.15 W

an exhibition by

Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs through August 8, 2018 through September 3, 2018

Opening reception on Sunday, August 11, 2018 from noon to 2pm

 

 

Titled for Biscayne Bay’s longitude, “80.15 W” features the 17 threatened and endangered species that call Biscayne National Park (in Miami, FL) home. In 2010, Cortada created the drawings on carbon paper, a metaphor for the impact (or “carbon footprint”) that humans have had on that animal, even across the boundaries of protected nature preserve. The carbon paper originals were premiered at the national park’s gallery and are in the permanent collection of NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

Artistree Gallery presents “Epoch” exhibit in Vermont

Xavier Cortada, “Trilobite (Cambrian),” mixed media on paper, 12″ x 16″, 2017.

You are cordially invited to

EPOCH

a solo show by

Xavier Cortada

at

Artistree Gallery
2095 Pomfret Road
South Pomfret, VT 05067

See: EPOCH | Gallery

Closing reception: Saturday, July 14th, 5-7pm with Cuban inspired appetizers and drinks.

Exhibit Dates: June 26th – July 14th

This exhibit is part of Artistree’s Cuban Cultural Festival on July 14th.

 

With half of Earth’s species now facing the risk of extinction, Xavier Cortada’s EPOCH exhibition examines life forms from the past 540 million years and invites the viewer to ponder what future life forms may look like on Planet Earth. This is a relevant conversation, since our species has a huge role in determining the outcome. Indeed, we are the cause of the Sixth Mass Extinction currently underway.

A decade ago, Cortada launched his Endangered World project at the South Pole to bring awareness to the plights of endangered species at every point in the world above.  The project has addressed global biodiversity loss through art installations at the South Pole (2007), North Pole (2008), Holland (2009) and Biscayne National Park (2010) and through online participatory art projects (www.endangeredworld.org).

Learn more EPOCH | Gallery
See original exhibition at www.cortada.com/event/2017/epoch

“Epoch” exhibit at Pinecrest Gardens

EPOCH | Gallery | Event Invitation

 

 

You are cordially invited to

EPOCH

a solo show by

Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Meet the artist at the exhibit opening on November 30th, 2017 at 7pm.

Exhibit runs through January 14th, 2018

 

With half of Earth’s species now facing the risk of extinction, Xavier Cortada’s EPOCH exhibition examines life forms from the past 540 million years and invites the viewer to ponder what future life forms may look like on Planet Earth. This is a relevant conversation, since our species has a huge role in determining the outcome. Indeed, we are the cause of the Sixth Mass Extinction currently underway.

A decade ago, Cortada launched his Endangered World project at the South Pole to bring awareness to the plights of endangered species at every point in the world above.  The project has addressed global biodiversity loss through art installations at the South Pole (2007), North Pole (2008), Holland (2009) and Biscayne National Park (2010) and through online participatory art projects (www.endangeredworld.org).

Epoch runs November 30th, 2017 through January 14th, 2018

Learn more at www.cortada.com/event/2017/epoch

Regis House presents: Seahorses exhibit closing event

SeahorsesGallery | Opening InvitationPress release | Closing Invitation

Xavier Cortada, “Seahorse Society: South” 48″ x 36″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

Join us on

Thursday, May 11th, 2017
from 6 pm to 8 pm

for the official closing of

Seahorses

an exhibit by

Xavier Cortada

at

Pinecrest Gardens
Historic Entrance

11000 S Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs April 6 – May 11th, 2017th

 

Proceeds from sales will benefit Regis House.
As a law student, Cortada served as Executive Director of the adolescent drug and alcohol abuse center.

Founded in 1984, Regis House is a non-profit, 501(c)(3), charitable, community-based organization with the mission to improve lives for a healthy community through mental health, family support and substance abuse services.  Regis House, Inc. has served more than 70,000 families throughout Miami-Dade County since its inception.  Programs and services such as co-occurring psychiatric/mental health, substance abuse services, individual, group, and family counseling/therapy, school-based prevention programs, and public assistance programs are many of the programs, and services the agency has to offer.

Seahorse Society at Sweetwater Elementary School

 

Sweetwater Elementary students to join the Seahorse Society 

Xavier Cortada, “Hippocampus,” 48″ x 24″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada to present an educational event at Sweetwater Elementary school on May 2nd, 2017. We will be teaching students about Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!  Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida and discuss the educational and research efforts conducted by her international group (see www.projectseahorse.org).  Students will also participate in a collaborative art project culminating in an installation that captures their pledge to protect them.  At the end of the event, students will be inducted into the Seahorse Society.  The performance and activity is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

 

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens Earth Day Festival

 

Reclamation Projects to celebrate Earth Day 2017
by implementing Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada for a community event at Pinecrest Gardens this #EarthDay Weekend. We will be engaging visitors with Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!

 

Seahorse Society is a participatory art project by Xavier Cortada.  It promotes the educational and research efforts of www.projectseahorse.org

Join us at the Historic Entrance Gallery at Pinecrest Gardens on Earth Day Festival and learn about seahorses. Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will be there to discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida. Kids will be able draw seahorses and take a pledge to protect them.

The Seahorse Society activity at Pinecrest Gardens during the Earth Day Festival is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

Sweetwater Elementary to grow FLOR500 wildflowers in every student’s home

 

FLOR500 | Sweetwater
Miami artist Xavier Cortada will lead Sweetwater Elementary School students in creating a participatory eco-art project in support of the pollinators.  Inspired by his FLOR500 project (www.flor500.com), kids at the school will plant wildflower seeds to grow in their classroom.  Each student will have a cup with their name on it.  Each student will also create a hand-painted flag celebrating Earth Day.  Once sprouted, the student will take the wildflower plants home and plant them alongside their flags.  Planting the flag, they will become reverse conquistadores, returning a patch of land back to nature.

The first garden (see photo above) featured Coreopsis lanceolata, the official state wildflower. It was planted in front of the Museum of Florida History in Tallahassee, FL on March 22, 2012 and dedicated to Florida’s indigenous people.

 

“Each of us has a role in helping shape Florida’s natural history,” said Cortada.  “We can help reclaim nature, one yard at a time, by planting wildflower gardens to support our pollinators.”  Cortada hopes his art piece will help educate individuals about the importance of Florida’s ecosystems and encourage better environmental stewardship.  This FLOR500 | Sweetwater participatory eco-art project at Sweetwater Elementary School is presented by FIU Frost Art Museum, FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Sciences & Education, the FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts, and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

 FLOR500 is a participatory art, nature, and history project created by Miami artist Xavier Cortada to commemorate Florida’s quincentennial in 2013. The project marks the importance of the moment when the history of our state changed forever and gives us a glimpse of what its landscape was like 500 years ago.
500 flowers
A team of scientists selected the 500 native flowers-  the same ones that grew in our state when Juan Ponce de Leon landed in 1513 and named it “La Florida”–from “flor,” the Spanish word for flower.
500 artists
Five hundred Floridians were then invited to depict 500 native wildflowers. The artwork, along with information about each flower, will be posted on the project website (www.FLOR500.com).500 gardens
A team of historians selected individuals who helped shape Florida history.  Florida schools and libraries (across the 67 counties and 8 regions) are encouraged to plant 500 wildflower gardens, dedicating them to one of 500 important Floridians selected by a team of historians.  These 500 new native habitats will help support Florida’s biodiversity.

Wildflowers, with help of their pollinators, help make Earth verdant:  Plant life sustains all animals (including humans) and balance atmospheric gases (that accelerate global climate change). Wildflowers would naturally continue to blanket our planet were it not for the displacement caused by the concrete we’ve poured ‐‐ and the parcels we’ve platted ‐‐ to build our homes and grow our society. Help reverse the trend:  Show us your wild side. Plant wildflowers in your yard.”
— Xavier Cortada

About the Artist: 

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Sciences & Education  and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art efforts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

Fore more info visit http://www.cortada.com

Project Seahorse presents “Seahorses” exhibit, launches initiative

SeahorsesGallery | Opening Invitation | Press release | Closing Invitation

Join us for the official opening of
Xavier Cortada’s “Seahorses” art exhibit on

Thursday, April 6th, 2017
from 6 pm to 8 pm 

as we launch Project Seahorse‘s latest initiative

Seahorses: Magical Creatures in your Backyard

As space is limited, please RSVP to this opening event here: https://seahorses.eventbrite.ca

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Seahorse Society: East” 48″ x 36″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

Seahorses

an exhibit by

Xavier Cortada

at

Pinecrest Gardens
Historic Entrance

11000 S Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs April 6 – May 12th, 2017th


 

 


Project Seahorse is a marine conservation group dedicated to securing a world where marine ecosystems are healthy and well-managed.  Their “Seahorses: Magical Creatures in Our Backyard” initiative aims to build awareness about seahorses and other syngnathids in Biscayne National Park and inspire residents of Miami-Dade County to take action to protect the park and their oceans.  Charismatic symbols of the seagrasses, mangroves, reefs and estuaries they call home, seahorses are flagship species for a wide range of marine conservation issues in Biscayne National Park.” Learn more at http://www.projectseahorse.org.

“This campaign made possible through the generous support of the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation. The Herbert W. Hoover Foundation takes a leadership role in funding unique opportunities that provide solutions to issues related to the community, education, and the environment.”

 

National Wildlife Federation and Florida Immigrant Coalition present “Art on Climate, Act on Climate”

 

Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.

The National Wildlife Federation and Florida Immigrant Coalition are joining forces to co-host an art exhibition and community dialogue on climate impacts in Miami and what we can do to shape our future for people and wildlife. We’ll hear from renowned local artist Xavier Cortada as well as representatives of diverse array of groups, including immigrants’ rights NGOs, climate activists, government, and academics. Admission is free.

Cortada, who serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU College of Arts, Sciences & Education (CASE), School of Environment, Art and Society (SEAS) and FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA), will be presenting his DO NOT OPEN ritualistic installation.

 

 

 

CONTACT: Casey J. Skeens, Communications Manager, SkeensC@NWF.org, 202-797-6808

 

MEDIA ADVISORY

January 27th: #ArtOnClimate / #ActOnClimate
Miami’s Future in a Changing Climate: An Art Exhibit and Panel Discussion

Miami, FL (January 27, 2017) – The National Wildlife Federation and Florida Immigrant Coalition are co-hosting a free art exhibition and community dialogue on climate impacts in Miami and what we can do to shape our future for people and wildlife. We’ll hear from renowned local artist Xavier Cortada, as well as a diverse panel of stakeholders, including nonprofits who work on immigrants’ rights, climate activists, government officials, and academics. Reporters are invited to attend.

 

WHEN: Friday, January 27th from 7pm – 10pm

WHERE: Barrio Workshop 520 W Flagler St, Miami, FL 33130

SPEAKERS:

Maria Rodriguez, Florida Immigrant Coalition

Xavier Cortada, Miami-based climate artist

Valencia Gunder, Climate Organizer for Florida New Majority

Lis-Marie Alvarado, Organizer for La Madre Tierra

Camilo Mejía, Networks Director for Catalyst Miami

FLORIDA IMMIGRANT COALITION EXPERT AVAILABLE: Maria Rodriguez, Executive Director

Maria has worked to defend basic human rights of low-income and migrant peoples for 25 years. She is a graduate of Georgetown University, where Maria was active in the anti-apartheid and Central America solidarity movements. She has worked to defend public health care coverage and promoted the growth of award-winning free clinics: La Clinica del Pueblo in Washington, D.C. and Good News Care Center in Florida. She also served as Deputy Director of the Human Services Coalition in South Florida. She founded FLIC in 2005.

NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION EXPERT AVAILABLE: Amy Hedges, Regional Outreach Campaign Manager

Amy is a native Ohioan now based in Washington, DC focused on coalition building and outreach around climate, clean water, and conservation. Amy began her nonprofit career as an Americorps member, spending a service year building and maintaining trails across the Ozarks, removing invasive species, and even moonlighting as a wild land firefighter in Montana. In her subsequent roles with Ohio Citizen Action and Clean Water Action, she personally motivated thousands of individuals to voice concerns to decision-makers and trained dozens of new organizers across the Midwest and in Miami, FL. Hedges and her teams’ direct person-to-person engagement resulted in multiple environmental victories on industry pollution, mountaintop removal coal mining, and state level support for clean energy.

For more information, contact Casey J. Skeens, Communications Manager, SkeensC@NWF.org, 202-797-6808

The National Wildlife Federation is America’s largest conservation organization inspiring Americans to protect wildlife for our children’s future. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

 


La Federación Nacional de Vida Silvestre y la Coalición de Inmigrantes de Florida presentarán una exhibición de arte y un diálogo comunitario sobre los impactos climáticos en Miami y lo que podemos hacer para dar forma a nuestro futuro para la gente y la vida silvestre. Escucharemos al renombrado artista local Xavier Cortada, así como representantes de diversos grupos, incluyendo organizaciones sin fines de lucro de derechos de inmigrantes, activistas del clima, gobierno y académicos. La admisión es gratis.