A Sea Change (Mary Ann Wolfe Theatre)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.

A Sea Change (Wertheim Performing Arts Center)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.

“Now More Than Ever” Science Art Talk at Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, FL

Xavier Cortada, “Now More than Ever” digital art*, 2016.

FIU Artist-in-Residence Xavier Cortada will be the third-Thursday speaker at the Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, FL on the February 16th, 2017.  He will give his science art talk during an exhibit featuring the work of Deep-sea explorer and MacArthur Award Winner, Dr. Edie Widder.  “Now more than ever scientists and artists play a critical role: Scientists must continue to record how the climate responds to changing policies. Artists need to use art to effectuate change; to capture this moment,” said Cortada.

ILLUMINATING THE DEEP: The Fine Art of Exploration

Explore.  Learn.  Act.

Deep-sea explorer and MacArthur Award Winner, Dr. Edie Widder, collaborated with artist and inventor, Dr. Steve Bernstein, to create this blockbuster exhibition filled with astonishing digitally enhanced photos of living creatures that sparkle and glow and flash with light from within.  Combined with the original artwork of Else Bostlemann, from Dr. William Beebe’s historic National Geographic bathysphere expeditions of the 1930s, this is a show of epic proportions.  Compare yourself to the life-size giant squid (first photographed by Dr. Widder) or paint with light in virtual reality, you can immerse yourself in the wonders of our planet’s last frontier. Plan your group tour now and be sure to download a copy of our featured article in Oceanography magazine written by Dr. Widder:

http://www.tos.org/oceanography/assets/docs/29-4_widder.pdf

Exhibition Dates:  December 22, 2016 – March 4, 2017

No charge for members, non-members $10

Read article Edie wrote for Oceanography magazine:

CLIMA 2016: DO NOT OPEN

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

CLIMA 2016: DO NOT OPEN
DO NOT OPEN:  Poem | Participant Instructions

Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment
Hialeah Seniors

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Xavier Cortada, "Testamento," archival ink on aluminum, 2015

Xavier Cortada, “Testamento,” archival ink on aluminum, 2015

CLIMA 2016 Panel: The Art of Climate Change

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

CLIMA Panel: The Art of Climate Change
Tuesday, December 6th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

 

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Moderator:  Dean Brian Schriner, Dean, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts

Xavier Cortada, Artist-in-Residence, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts and School of Environment, Art and Society
Micheal Gray, MFA candidate in Visual Arts: Studio Practice, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts
Miriam Machado, Education Curator, FIU Frost Art Museum

CLIMA 2016 | Opening Reception

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

CLIMA OPENING RECEPTION:
Friday, December 2nd, 2016 at 7pm
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

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An Emotional Lexicon for Climate Change: WONDER, DENIAL, DISAPPOINTMENT, GRIEF, and HOPE

fragile habitat vizcaya

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AN EMOTIONAL LEXICON FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

6:30PM 

WONDER, DENIAL, DISAPPOINTMENT, GRIEF, AND HOPE

 6:30PM – Reception, Event at 7:00PM

Vizcaya Museum & Gardens.

Reflect with local environmental humanities scholars on how arts and culture can help us understand the feelings we might have as we think about climate change.

 

A PUBLIC EVENT SERIES
BRINGING MIAMI TOGETHER TO
DISCUSS OUR FUTURE
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Organized by the Department of History of the Green School of International and Public Affairs, Florida International University in collaboration with HistoryMiami Museum, The Kampong, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, The Wolfsonian-FIU, Miami Dade County Public Schools’ Department of Social Sciences, the FIU Green Library Digital Collections Center, and Catalyst Miami

Made possible in part by a major grant from the Humanities in the Public Square Initiative of The National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating 50 Years of Excellence

Explore the challenges Miami faces from climate change through culture and history. Join nationally recognized scholars and local environmentalists for stories about our connections to this unique and fragile landscape. How can we come together to imagine our future and prioritize what is most valuable, just, and worthy of preservation?

For more information about the NEH-funded Ecohumanities for Cities in Crisis Event Series, please see ecohumanities.fiu.edu

Hot for Hialeah

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To watch livesteam of event click here.

13631520_10154815795413797_2813645488353212933_n huevo frito Hot For Hialeah

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For Immediate Release:
July 25, 2016

Media Contact:
Francys Vallecillo
305-883-5800

The City of Hialeah Joins the American Red Cross and other Partners to Discuss Heat Safety

What:
Mayor Carlos Hernandez and the City Council invite our friends from the media to join us for a first-of-its-kind event, titled “Hot for Hialeah”, on Wednesday, July 27th from noon to 1:45pm at the JFK Library. The City of Hialeah will partner with local leaders, the American Red Cross, Climate Scientist Nicole Hammer, Sea Level Solutions Center of Florida International University with Union of Concerned Scientists, artist Xavier Cortada, and Moms Clean Air Force in order to educate the public about climate change impacts.

According to NASA and NOAA, 2015 was, globally, the hottest year since record keeping began in 1880. The ten hottest years on record have all happened since 1998. The last eight months have all broken records for average monthly global temperatures. Miami is one of the most vulnerable places in the US to extreme heat events caused by climate change. A 2001 NRDC report stated “Projected global warming will raise Florida’s average temperature by between four and ten degrees Fahrenheit over the next 100 years. The summer heat index increase of eight to 15 degrees Fahrenheit will be the most dramatic in the nation.” Preliminary research indicates that Hialeah may experience relatively higher temperatures than other parts of the county. This may be due to various factors including its inland location, extensive urban development and sparse tree canopy. Low-income communities and seniors are some of the most vulnerable to extreme heat events. The City of Hialeah is hosting the American Red Cross and others to educate and empower residents, especially the seniors, in order to create resiliency in the face of climate change impacts.

Following the speakers, a performance piece of an egg frying a solar panel will take place.

Name of Event:
Hot for Hialeah

Address:
JFK Library
190 West 49 Street
Hialeah, FL 33012

Date and Time:
July 27th, Noon

About the participants:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @SFLRedCross.

As a climate change researcher, Nicole Hernandez Hammer has studied how the cities and regions most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, storm surge and sea-level rise also have large Hispanic populations — something she learned firsthand growing up and living in South Florida. Today Nicole works with the Union of Concerned Scientists as their Southeast Climate Advocate, her focus is to mobilize the Latino community to better understand and address climate change.

Florida International University Sea Level Solutions Center (SLSC):
The Sea Level Solutions Center is dedicated to designing and implementing short- and long-term adaptation strategies for a prosperous South Florida in the 22nd century by advancing the understanding of sea level rise and its impacts, and converting this understanding into actions that benefit society on a global scale.

Xavier Cortada is the Artist-in-Residence, School of Environment, Arts and Society (SEAS), College of Arts, Sciences & Education (CASE) Florida International University and College of Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) Florida International University.

Karina Castillo is the Latino Outreach Organizer for Moms Clean Air Force in Florida. Karina holds a Masters of Professional Science degree in Weather, Climate, and Society from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami. She also holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Meteorology and Applied Mathematics from the University of Miami. Karina has worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and for the Miami-Dade County Office of Emergency Management.

The City of Hialeah, incorporated in 1925, is the fifth largest municipality in Florida, serving over 233,000 residents living in approximately 20-square miles. Hialeah, located in NW Miami-Dade County, has a Hispanic population of over 94%. A working class community, Hialeah is viewed as an industrial city that continues to grow. “The City of Progress” as known to many, is home to many Cuban exiles. The City of Hialeah is a full service city offering quality and affordable services to residents of all ages and abilities. Hialeah is a vibrant, family oriented community marked by cultural heritage and traditions known for its myriad of mom and pop stores which productively compete against national retail and restaurant chains and franchises. The City of Hialeah is on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram!

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To watch livesteam of event click here.