January 2024- Cortada wins National Academies’ Award; unveils mural at Temple Beth Sholom

Artist joins Princeton as Research Fellow

NATIONAL ACADEMIES OF SCIENCES, ENGINEERING & MEDICINE HONOR CORTADA

On January 12th, 2024, Xavier Cortada received a prestigious Excellence in Science Communications Award ($20,000 Prize) from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine in Washington, DC. 

“Cortada’s enduring body of work is excellent, effectively raising awareness about environmental issues through an emotionally charged and easily accessible approach. His work serves as a powerful testament to the transformative potential of socially engaged art, empowering individuals to take collective action. By skillfully marrying science, art and activism, Cortada not only elicits empathy but also empowers viewers to become agents of change.

In a world where environmental concerns loom large, Cortada’s work is a shining example of how science and art can transcend boundaries, touch hearts, and inspire meaningful, collective action in the face of pressing challenges.”

The Presidents of the National Academies
of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM CELEBRATES LEGACY WITH CORTADA'S MURAL

 

 

 

 

Commissioned by the Ansin Foundation, Xavier Cortada created a ceramic mural for Temple Beth Sholom‘s 80th anniversary. Rabbi Gayle Pomerantz, Andy Ansin, and James Ansin led the dedication, honoring the family’s membership since 1942. The mural, featuring mangroves, symbolizes the congregation’s deep roots and sense of connectedness.

PRINCETON TAPS CORTADA TO EXPLORE CREATIVE APPROACHES

Xavier Cortada was selected to serve as a Princeton University Center for Migration and Development (CMD) Research Fellow. The Center fosters a vibrant community of scholarship, original research, and intellectual collaboration among faculty and students focused on the intersections of international migration and national development. In this context, Cortada will work with the team to explore the integration of aesthetic creativity with grassroots movements and the use of socially engaged art to amplify awareness about critical issues like climate change and immigration. Additionally, he is set to contribute to these discussions in his upcoming presentation as part of the 2024 Spring Colloquium Series.

FORECAST PUBLIC ART: WHY PUBLIC ARTISTS ARE CRITICAL PARTNERS FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCE

“I developed The Underwater to help my neighbors understand our vulnerability to rising seas and give them the tools to take action,” Cortada says. “In ways that only art can, The Underwater seeds ideas of both responsibility and agency. For Miamians, this initiative brings the urgency of the climate crisis straight to their front door—hyperlocal and personal. It also uplifts and amplifies the voices of those who often go unheard in the pursuit of climate justice for all.”