“Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy…”

In 2005, I was asked to create the 2006 Florida Heritage Month poster.  I was charged with depicting the 5 flags that flew over my home state since Europeans made contact.  Every fourth-grade classroom was to receive the poster.  Instead of painting a Confederate flag, I chose to depict the demise of the Confederacy.

Below is the statement that I wrote then.  It was printed on the back side of every poster.

Xavier Cortada, “Five Flags / Florida,” 61.5″ x 96″, acrylic on canvas, 2005 “Five Flags/Florida” (Cortada’s “Five Flags / Florida” is In the collection of the Florida Department of State, commissioned for the 2006 Florida Heritage Month Commemorative Poster.)

 

“Five Flags/Florida” (2006)

Miami artist Xavier Cortada utilized the Florida coastline to depict its heritage: each wave represents a new wave of immigrants who set roots and established communities. The mangrove roots metaphorically depict our interconnectedness as people who share a rich and diverse cultural history.

The mangrove root on the left symbolizes Florida’s indigenous people. The two clusters of clouds above mark their first encounter with Europeans: Juan Ponce de Leon’s landing in 1513.

Each of the mangrove plants rising above the horizon represent the five flags that have since flown over the peninsula:

The first plant has two sets of leaves representing Spain’s two periods of control: 1513-1763 and 1784-1821. The leaves on the second plant resemble the fleur-de-lis on the French flag when it was flown over Florida during 1564-65. Great Britain’s reign over Florida, 1763-1784, is shown as a mangrove plant with sliced leaves as it divided the territory into East Florida and West Florida. As the war for American independence ended, all of the territory was returned to the Spanish.

In 1821, the United States bought Florida from Spain for $5 million. The fourth plant represents the American flag. Back then the American flag had 24 stars. That number grew by three when Florida became the 27th state in 1845. The plant is bifurcated because Florida split from the Union in 1861 to join the Confederacy. After the Confederacy was defeated, Florida returned to the Union at the end of the Civil War in 1865. Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy.

The mangrove root on the right honors those whose search for freedom (e.g.: Seminoles, slaves using the Underground Railroad, Holocaust survivors, Cuban exiles, and Haitian refugees among others) brought them to Florida’s shores.

The painting, “Five Flags/Florida,” was created by Mr. Cortada for Florida Heritage Month 2006.

 

Miami Light Project presents Xavier Cortada’s “Oath” on Inauguration Day


Miami Light Project

presents

Oath

by

Xavier Cortada

with the participation of
Marcos D. Jimenez
Former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida

on
Inauguration Day
Friday, January 20th, 2017
11:30 am

at
Miami Light Project
404 NW 26th St, 33127
Miami, FL

(305) 576-6480

 

Oath
Oath is a performative piece that brings citizens together towards a common purpose to uphold our Constitution. As part of Cortada’s performance, Mr. Jimenez will administer this Oath to all those present at noon (the exact time that the President-Elect takes office):

 

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute my role as ‪#Citizen of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, ‪#preserve, ‪#protect and ‪#defend the ‪#Constitution of the United States.

 

 

Reading of the US Constitution

Between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm, individuals will gather to simultaneously read the United States Constitution out loud in English, in Spanish, and in Haitian Creole.

 

Oath serves to launch Culture of Resistance (www.cultureofresistance.com),” a 48-month, socially-engaged performance project by Xavier Cortada based at the Miami Light Project (www.miamilightproject.com)