EU Climate Diplomacy Day | Naming of Antarctic Ice Paintings: Global Coastlines

Xavier Cortada will participate in EU Climate Diplomacy Day.

On September 27, 2018, at the Storer Auditorium in the Miami Business School, the artist will engage the audience in his DO NOT OPEN performance, asking them to write letters to the future.  The artist will also invite five General Consuls to randomly select one of the 60 paintings the artist made by melting Antarctic ice  and name it after one of their own country’s coastal cities made vulnerable by the melting of that same Antarctic ice.  The five European consuls will be the first to randomly name the Global Coastlines series of the Antarctic Ice Paintings.  The remaining 55 works will be named at a ceremony in Pinecrest Gardens Hibiscus Gallery on November 29, 2018, see http://hibiscusgallery.com/about-2018-icepaintings.

 

 

For more information contact:

Axel Zeissig, Vice Consul, Generalkonsulat der Bundesrepublik Deutschland
Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany
100 N Biscayne Blvd., Suite 2200, Miami, FL 33132
Phone (305) 358-0290 ext. 585
Fax (305) 358-0307

“Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy…”

In 2005, I was asked to create the 2006 Florida Heritage Month poster.  I was charged with depicting the 5 flags that flew over my home state since Europeans made contact.  Every fourth-grade classroom was to receive the poster.  Instead of painting a Confederate flag, I chose to depict the demise of the Confederacy.

Below is the statement that I wrote then.  It was printed on the back side of every poster.

Xavier Cortada, “Five Flags / Florida,” 61.5″ x 96″, acrylic on canvas, 2005 “Five Flags/Florida” (Cortada’s “Five Flags / Florida” is In the collection of the Florida Department of State, commissioned for the 2006 Florida Heritage Month Commemorative Poster.)

 

“Five Flags/Florida” (2006)

Miami artist Xavier Cortada utilized the Florida coastline to depict its heritage: each wave represents a new wave of immigrants who set roots and established communities. The mangrove roots metaphorically depict our interconnectedness as people who share a rich and diverse cultural history.

The mangrove root on the left symbolizes Florida’s indigenous people. The two clusters of clouds above mark their first encounter with Europeans: Juan Ponce de Leon’s landing in 1513.

Each of the mangrove plants rising above the horizon represent the five flags that have since flown over the peninsula:

The first plant has two sets of leaves representing Spain’s two periods of control: 1513-1763 and 1784-1821. The leaves on the second plant resemble the fleur-de-lis on the French flag when it was flown over Florida during 1564-65. Great Britain’s reign over Florida, 1763-1784, is shown as a mangrove plant with sliced leaves as it divided the territory into East Florida and West Florida. As the war for American independence ended, all of the territory was returned to the Spanish.

In 1821, the United States bought Florida from Spain for $5 million. The fourth plant represents the American flag. Back then the American flag had 24 stars. That number grew by three when Florida became the 27th state in 1845. The plant is bifurcated because Florida split from the Union in 1861 to join the Confederacy. After the Confederacy was defeated, Florida returned to the Union at the end of the Civil War in 1865. Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy.

The mangrove root on the right honors those whose search for freedom (e.g.: Seminoles, slaves using the Underground Railroad, Holocaust survivors, Cuban exiles, and Haitian refugees among others) brought them to Florida’s shores.

The painting, “Five Flags/Florida,” was created by Mr. Cortada for Florida Heritage Month 2006.