DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450” exhibit

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada
will be exhibiting his Native Flags project (www.nativeflags.org)
and his 2015 work, 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas.
at

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450”

An international symposium and curated exhibit focused on the intersection of science and art.
Exhibit & Special Event on Saturday, April 22, 2017
3:30 pm -10:00 pm; Free and open to the public
Exhibit on display from April 9 – June 26, 2017

 

HIT IT: Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it!,” video screen shot, 2015.
In acknowledgement of the support from the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

 

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it! | Burn it! | Eat it! | Freeze itBury it! video documentation of performance, 2015
Xavier Cortada

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas was created by Xavier Cortada during April-May 2015 during an artist residency at the Rising Seas Confab 2015, Rauschenberg Studio, Captiva, Florida. In this performance, Cortada comments with irony on the weak to non-existent actions being taken to address both the causes and the imminent realities of climate disruption in a State clearly at the epicenter of potential disaster—one which has been caused by inadequate action globally on soaring levels of greenhouse gases related to human activity.

Cortada has long been involved in art that intervenes in, and/or comments upon environmental problems. He has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Poleand direct-impact ecological art projects, in Florida, around the US, and internationally, (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland).

Xavier Cortada is Florida-educated and has lived in Miami since he was three. He is currently Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Science & Education and the College of Communication, Architecture + the Arts. (http://www.cortada.com)

 

ABOUT DEERING ESTATE:

The Deering Estate offers complimentary exhibit evenings, highlighting a variety of contemporary, historic, and visiting exhibitions inside the historic homes. Exhibit Evenings are free of charge and offer the public a chance to interact with artists and curators and to experience a variety of exhibit tours and talks. Exhibit Evenings are held from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, unless otherwise noted. Exhibit on view daily, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Free with Estate Admission.

Alaska Residency: University of Alaska Fairbanks (cancelled)


 

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FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada will travel to Alaska to engage in research for his EVER/PERMA project addressing sea-level rise and global climate change concerns.  This is part of his science art practice conducted in partnership with FIU SEAS and FCE LTER faculty (and now with faculty in the  University of Alaska in Fairbanks).

Here’s a blurb about the Ever/Perma research effort:

Ever/Perma is a new body of work being developed by Xavier Cortada.  In it, he uses art to engage community members in addressing environmental degradation, global climate change, and sea level rise concerns. He does so chiefly through the development and implementation of participatory ecological art projects, site-specific artistic interventions in Alaska and Florida, and a programmed exhibit at the project’s conclusion. During the project, Cortada will also convene community meetings, work groups, discussion panels and lectures to activate ideas.
Specifically, “Ever/Perma” will address how global climate change is disrupting the ecosystems at both ends of our country:  sea level rise threatens the Everglades; warmer temperatures are thawing the Arctic permafrost.  Scientists tell us that as both of these ecosystems are degraded by human impacts they release methane (20x more potent than carbon dioxide) into the atmosphere and further disrupt our global climate.

Now more than ever, scientists and artists play a critical role: Scientists must continue to record how the climate responds to changing policies. Artists need to use art to effectuate change; to capture this moment.

ArtTuesdays talk: Sea Level Rise

ARTtuesday/Miami Networking & Lecture
ARTISTS RESPOND TO GROWING SEA LEVEL RISE CRISIS

 

The crisis of Global Warming and its rapidly threatening effects on Sea Level Rise is a reality that will affect everyone in South Florida (and beyond). Miami-Dade County, Florida has more people living less than 4 feet above sea level than any U.S. state.  Artists address their concerns in innovative projects that will visually engage the audience and hopefully provoke a new awareness about our water and how Sea Level Rise can considerably influence human populations in coastal and island regions and natural environments.  This month’s conversation features three artists engaged in Sea Level Rise projects:

Anita Glesta, an internationally recognized artist, will present her project, WATERSHED, to the United States Conference of Mayors on Miami Beach in June to highlight the issue of climate change through site-responsive installations.

Tina Spiro is a Jamaica-based artist with close ties to South Florida.  Her Deep See: An Art Installation for the Sea is a collaborative multi-media project that focuses on environmental consciousness.

Miami artist Xavier Cortada is a long-time environmental activist who has been working in the Earth’s poles for the past decade to create site-specific installations that generate awareness about global climate change.

Dr. Carol Damian, Professor of Art History in the Department of Art & Art History at Florida International University, and curator for the Deep See project, will moderate the conversation.

When:
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Where:
Books & Books
265 Aragon Avenue
Coral Gables, FL 33134 7

6:00 pm to 6:45 pm Happy Hour * & Networking
6:45 pm to 7:00 pm
 Announcements
7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Panel and Q&A

All programs are open to the public and free of charge.

*Happy Hour runs from 4 to 7 pm at Books & Books on Second Tuesdays

 

ABOUT ARTtuesdays/MIAMI:

ARTtuesdays/MIAMI is a monthly series of community discussions focusing on art and culture. Free and open to the public. 6 – 7pm networking; 7 – 8pm Program + Q&A.

ARTtuesdays/MIAMI endeavors to spotlight and explore, exciting, timely and relevant developments and creative initiatives in culture, art, design, and architecture, that impact and transform South Florida and its citizens.

Presented the second Tuesday of each month, these enriching programs are introduced by articulate and savvy moderators who lead groups of knowledgeable and engaged panelists who are experts in their field.

Programs provide opportunities to network with new and good friends, engage in timely discussions while learning about cultural themes that impact our community.

ARTtuesdays/MIAMI is spearheaded by a group of volunteers who donate their time and resources to ensure that meetings are professionally organized and well attended. The program committee is comprised of Carol Damian, Lilia Garcia, Liana Pérez, Elisa Turner and Ilana Vardy.

“Now More Than Ever” Science Art Talk at Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, FL

Xavier Cortada, “Now More than Ever” digital art*, 2016.

FIU Artist-in-Residence Xavier Cortada will be the third-Thursday speaker at the Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, FL on the February 16th, 2017.  He will give his science art talk during an exhibit featuring the work of Deep-sea explorer and MacArthur Award Winner, Dr. Edie Widder.  “Now more than ever scientists and artists play a critical role: Scientists must continue to record how the climate responds to changing policies. Artists need to use art to effectuate change; to capture this moment,” said Cortada.

ILLUMINATING THE DEEP: The Fine Art of Exploration

Explore.  Learn.  Act.

Deep-sea explorer and MacArthur Award Winner, Dr. Edie Widder, collaborated with artist and inventor, Dr. Steve Bernstein, to create this blockbuster exhibition filled with astonishing digitally enhanced photos of living creatures that sparkle and glow and flash with light from within.  Combined with the original artwork of Else Bostlemann, from Dr. William Beebe’s historic National Geographic bathysphere expeditions of the 1930s, this is a show of epic proportions.  Compare yourself to the life-size giant squid (first photographed by Dr. Widder) or paint with light in virtual reality, you can immerse yourself in the wonders of our planet’s last frontier. Plan your group tour now and be sure to download a copy of our featured article in Oceanography magazine written by Dr. Widder:

http://www.tos.org/oceanography/assets/docs/29-4_widder.pdf

Exhibition Dates:  December 22, 2016 – March 4, 2017

No charge for members, non-members $10

Read article Edie wrote for Oceanography magazine:

Climate Wrongs and Human Rights (University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium)

2017 Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium, Climate Wrongs and Human Rights, has been announced. Scholarship from this annual event will be featured in the symposium issue to be published in the Volume 72, Winter Edition.

Student / General Public Registration – here

CLE Registration (8 credits available) – here

Friday, February 10, 2017

Saturday, February 11, 2017

University of Miami Storer Auditorium

5250 University Drive, Coral Gables, Florida 33146


About the Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review’s Symposium is an annual event that leads to the publication of an issue. This year’s Symposium, entitled “Climate Wrongs and Human Rights” will explore the human rights implications of climate change. Panelists will examine this topic through a variety of subjects, including democracy, federalism, immigration, and philosophy. The Symposium will also feature art by Miami Arist and UM Law Alum, Xavier Cortada.

Keynote Speaker 
Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe
Featured Artist 
Cortada will provide opening remarks on Saturday, February 11 and invite the audience to participate in his performative art project, titled “Do Not Open.” 

Panel I—Ground Zero: Miami

What does climate change mean for the City of Miami? This panel will provide a comparative analysis of adaptation measures amongst different parts of the city and will examine the disparate impact of climate change in Miami. This panel will explore if and how law and policy is mitigating the pressing effects of climate change in South Florida.

Panelists:

Abigail CorbettShareholder, Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A. 
Benjamin KirtmanProfessor, University of Miami Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science 
Elizabeth WheatonEnvironment and Sustainability Director, City of Miami Beach

Moderator: Catherine KaimanLecturer in Law, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel II—Climate Democracy 

Can democracy adequately address climate change and its human rights implications? This panel will explore how political and legal institutions must adapt to the ongoing crisis of climate change to effectuate meaningful solutions.

Panelists: 

Rebecca BratspiesProfessor of Law, The City University of New York School of Law
Dale JamiesonProfessor, New York University School of Law 
Alice KaswanProfessor, University of San Francisco School of Law 

Moderator: Felix MormannAssociate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law

Panel III—Climate Refugees 

Is the displacement of climate refugees a humanitarian concern? This panel will discuss the link between climate change and human migration. It will explore if and how immigration law and policy should evolve to address climate refugees.

Panelists: 

Sumudu AtapattuSenior Lecturer, University of Wisconsin Law School 
Michael GerrardProfessor, Columbia Law School 
Katrina WymanProfessor of Law, New York University School of Law 

Moderator: Roxana BaconVisiting Professor, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel IV—Climate Philosophy 

Is the right to a clean environment a human right? Do we have a duty to the next generation? We invite the audience to consider these questions as the panelists focus on the moral obligations individuals have in addressing climate change and in ameliorating the human rights implications of climate change. This panel will inquire as to the gaps in urgency between policy makers and scientists.

Panelists: 

Stephen GardinerProfessor, University of Washington 
Naomi OreskesProfessor, Harvard University 
Jacqueline PattersonDirector, Environmental and Climate Justice Program, NAACP

Moderator: James Nickel, Professor, University of Miami School of Law

 


A printable version of the tentative schedule is forthcoming. However, the tentative schedule can be found listed below:

Friday, February 10, 2017

1:00 p.m. – 1: 30 p.m.        Registration

1:30 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.         Welcome

1:35 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.         Introduction of Keynote

1:50 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.           Keynote: Chief Albert Naquin, Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean    Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe

2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.            Break

2:50 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.             Panel I – Ground Zero: Miami

4:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.             Break

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.              Panel II- Climate Democracy

Saturday, February 11, 2017

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.              Registration

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.              Welcome

9:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.            Panel III—Climate Refugees

11:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.          Break

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.            Panel IV – Climate Philosophy

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.              Closing

Cortada will participate in CLEO Panel Discussion during the Miami-Dade STEAM Expo

FIU SEAS & CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada will participate in CLEO Panel Discussion during the Miami-Dade STEAM Expo.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools – STEAM

Our Vision

Miami-Dade County Public Schools aspires to engage and prepare all our students in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics (STEAM) to ensure our community has the next generation of inventors, explorers, innovators, artists and leaders..

Our Mission

The mission of Miami-Dade County Public Schools STEAM is to leverage the expertise and capital of the Department of Career and Technical Education, the Department of Mathematics and Science and the Department of Visual and Performing Arts to increase student achievement in STEAM curriculum to promote career and college readiness.

Learn more at http://stem.dadeschools.net

 

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy presents “DO NOT OPEN” performance

 

Contact: Jennifer Rennicks, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Alissa@cleanenergy.org, 954-734-3773

 

ADVISORY: Miami Community Leaders, Elected Officials, and Artist, Join in Interactive Art Installation

to Highlight Sea Level Rise and Uncertain Future of South Florida

Event emphasizes climate action uncertainty as President-Elect Trump is inaugurated

 

Miami, Fla. – One day before the inauguration of climate change denier President-Elect Trump, Miami-based and globally featured artist Xavier Cortada will host a live performance as a portion of his ongoing research driven art, CLIMA 2016. The interactive exhibit “Do Not Open” invites participants to imagine the future of South Florida, its communities, and the effects of sea level rise, writing letters to future Floridians placed in a time capsule. 

When: January 19th at 7:00 PM

Where: Cortada Art Studio Gallery, 4664 SW 75th Avenue, Miami, FL 33155

Who:

  • Xavier Cortada
  • Elected Officials
  • Community Leaders
  • South Florida Residents

What: The event, through art, will draw attention to the challenge of climate change impacts to South Florida and the need for more action now. This is an especially critical and timely message as the event is being held only one day before the inauguration of a new president who vocally denies climate change and its effects already being felt by communities throughout the world. The Do Not Open art installation is a time capsule to capture written messages/letters that will be added to the exhibit by Xavier Cortada. The performance also coincides with the full gallery opening featuring a series of ceramic and tile works.

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Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.

DO NOT OPEN:  Participant Instructions | Artist’s Poem

City of Sweetwater submerged beneath a 6 foot sea level rise.

Submerged: City of Sweetwater beneath a 6-foot rise in sea level (using the eyesontherise app).

 

  • Walk up to the “Do Not Open” wall in the exhibit.
  • Close your eyes: Imagine your city in the future. Imagine how rising seas will impact it and those who will live here then.
  • Think about what you would like them to know. Think about what you believe someone living in 2041, 2066, 2116 or 2216 will need to hear from someone living in 2016.
  • Unclip a blank piece of paper and envelope from the wall and use a pencil to write it all down:  Tell them who you are. Tell them why you are writing to them. Sign it. Date it.
  • Fold the letter in two, kiss it, place it in the envelope and seal it.
  • On the outside of the envelope write only one of these four phrases:

“DO NOT OPEN: 25 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 50 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 100 years”
or
“DO NOT OPEN: 200 years”

  • Clip the sealed envelope to the “Do Not Open” wall with the words facing out.
  • Stare at your envelope for 25 seconds, 50 seconds, 100 seconds, or 200 seconds.
  • Think of how your words will be received in the future.
  • Walk away

Earlier Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

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Diatoms exhibit at Cortada Art Studio Gallery

Cortada’s one-hundred diatom works on tile (each 6″ x 6″), 2017.

Diatoms

on exhibit at

Cortada Art Studio Gallery
in the
Bird Road Art District
4664 SW 75th Avenue
Miami, FL 33155

By appointment: 305-858-1323

Xavier Cortada will be exhibiting a series of ceramic and tile works depicting diatoms.

Diatoms are single-celled organisms that live in the water and harness the power of the sun to convert CO2 into oxygen. Its glass shell, all that remains from the diatom, is used by scientists today to see what was as they research environmental issues crucial to the city in the century to come. Scientists—and artists—can determine the past salinity of water by examining the shells of diatoms preserved in sedimentary core samples. Each diatom species has a different salinity preference, so changes in the mixture of fresh and sea water (driven by sea level and changes in water management) can be inferred from past diatom remains.

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Tursiocola ziemanii,” 6″ x 6″, ceramic tile, 2017.  Learn more #diatom #art #tiledrawing

 

 

Xavier Cortada, 7. Azul B, framed bas relief ceramic sculpture, 7.5”x7.75”, 2017

 

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Paragon,” framed bas relief ceramic sculpture, 11”x7.5”, 2017.

 

 

Special thanks to Cerda, Llanos y Cia., Inc. for being the January 19th opening reception‘s wine sponsor.