A Sea Change (Mary Ann Wolfe Theatre)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.

A Sea Change (Wertheim Performing Arts Center)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.

Climate Wrongs and Human Rights (University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium)

2017 Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium, Climate Wrongs and Human Rights, has been announced. Scholarship from this annual event will be featured in the symposium issue to be published in the Volume 72, Winter Edition.

Student / General Public Registration – here

CLE Registration (8 credits available) – here

Friday, February 10, 2017

Saturday, February 11, 2017

University of Miami Storer Auditorium

5250 University Drive, Coral Gables, Florida 33146


About the Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review’s Symposium is an annual event that leads to the publication of an issue. This year’s Symposium, entitled “Climate Wrongs and Human Rights” will explore the human rights implications of climate change. Panelists will examine this topic through a variety of subjects, including democracy, federalism, immigration, and philosophy. The Symposium will also feature art by Miami Arist and UM Law Alum, Xavier Cortada.

Keynote Speaker 
Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe
Featured Artist 
Cortada will provide opening remarks on Saturday, February 11 and invite the audience to participate in his performative art project, titled “Do Not Open.” 

Panel I—Ground Zero: Miami

What does climate change mean for the City of Miami? This panel will provide a comparative analysis of adaptation measures amongst different parts of the city and will examine the disparate impact of climate change in Miami. This panel will explore if and how law and policy is mitigating the pressing effects of climate change in South Florida.

Panelists:

Abigail CorbettShareholder, Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A. 
Benjamin KirtmanProfessor, University of Miami Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science 
Elizabeth WheatonEnvironment and Sustainability Director, City of Miami Beach

Moderator: Catherine KaimanLecturer in Law, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel II—Climate Democracy 

Can democracy adequately address climate change and its human rights implications? This panel will explore how political and legal institutions must adapt to the ongoing crisis of climate change to effectuate meaningful solutions.

Panelists: 

Rebecca BratspiesProfessor of Law, The City University of New York School of Law
Dale JamiesonProfessor, New York University School of Law 
Alice KaswanProfessor, University of San Francisco School of Law 

Moderator: Felix MormannAssociate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law

Panel III—Climate Refugees 

Is the displacement of climate refugees a humanitarian concern? This panel will discuss the link between climate change and human migration. It will explore if and how immigration law and policy should evolve to address climate refugees.

Panelists: 

Sumudu AtapattuSenior Lecturer, University of Wisconsin Law School 
Michael GerrardProfessor, Columbia Law School 
Katrina WymanProfessor of Law, New York University School of Law 

Moderator: Roxana BaconVisiting Professor, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel IV—Climate Philosophy 

Is the right to a clean environment a human right? Do we have a duty to the next generation? We invite the audience to consider these questions as the panelists focus on the moral obligations individuals have in addressing climate change and in ameliorating the human rights implications of climate change. This panel will inquire as to the gaps in urgency between policy makers and scientists.

Panelists: 

Stephen GardinerProfessor, University of Washington 
Naomi OreskesProfessor, Harvard University 
Jacqueline PattersonDirector, Environmental and Climate Justice Program, NAACP

Moderator: James Nickel, Professor, University of Miami School of Law

 


A printable version of the tentative schedule is forthcoming. However, the tentative schedule can be found listed below:

Friday, February 10, 2017

1:00 p.m. – 1: 30 p.m.        Registration

1:30 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.         Welcome

1:35 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.         Introduction of Keynote

1:50 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.           Keynote: Chief Albert Naquin, Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean    Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe

2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.            Break

2:50 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.             Panel I – Ground Zero: Miami

4:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.             Break

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.              Panel II- Climate Democracy

Saturday, February 11, 2017

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.              Registration

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.              Welcome

9:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.            Panel III—Climate Refugees

11:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.          Break

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.            Panel IV – Climate Philosophy

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.              Closing

Miami Light Project presents Xavier Cortada’s “Oath” on Inauguration Day


Miami Light Project

presents

Oath

by

Xavier Cortada

with the participation of
Marcos D. Jimenez
Former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida

on
Inauguration Day
Friday, January 20th, 2017
11:30 am

at
Miami Light Project
404 NW 26th St, 33127
Miami, FL

(305) 576-6480

 

Oath
Oath is a performative piece that brings citizens together towards a common purpose to uphold our Constitution. As part of Cortada’s performance, Mr. Jimenez will administer this Oath to all those present at noon (the exact time that the President-Elect takes office):

 

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute my role as ‪#Citizen of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, ‪#preserve, ‪#protect and ‪#defend the ‪#Constitution of the United States.

 

 

Reading of the US Constitution

Between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm, individuals will gather to simultaneously read the United States Constitution out loud in English, in Spanish, and in Haitian Creole.

 

Oath serves to launch Culture of Resistance (www.cultureofresistance.com),” a 48-month, socially-engaged performance project by Xavier Cortada based at the Miami Light Project (www.miamilightproject.com)

 

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy presents “DO NOT OPEN” performance

 

Contact: Jennifer Rennicks, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Alissa@cleanenergy.org, 954-734-3773

 

ADVISORY: Miami Community Leaders, Elected Officials, and Artist, Join in Interactive Art Installation

to Highlight Sea Level Rise and Uncertain Future of South Florida

Event emphasizes climate action uncertainty as President-Elect Trump is inaugurated

 

Miami, Fla. – One day before the inauguration of climate change denier President-Elect Trump, Miami-based and globally featured artist Xavier Cortada will host a live performance as a portion of his ongoing research driven art, CLIMA 2016. The interactive exhibit “Do Not Open” invites participants to imagine the future of South Florida, its communities, and the effects of sea level rise, writing letters to future Floridians placed in a time capsule. 

When: January 19th at 7:00 PM

Where: Cortada Art Studio Gallery, 4664 SW 75th Avenue, Miami, FL 33155

Who:

  • Xavier Cortada
  • Elected Officials
  • Community Leaders
  • South Florida Residents

What: The event, through art, will draw attention to the challenge of climate change impacts to South Florida and the need for more action now. This is an especially critical and timely message as the event is being held only one day before the inauguration of a new president who vocally denies climate change and its effects already being felt by communities throughout the world. The Do Not Open art installation is a time capsule to capture written messages/letters that will be added to the exhibit by Xavier Cortada. The performance also coincides with the full gallery opening featuring a series of ceramic and tile works.

###

Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.

DO NOT OPEN:  Participant Instructions | Artist’s Poem

City of Sweetwater submerged beneath a 6 foot sea level rise.

Submerged: City of Sweetwater beneath a 6-foot rise in sea level (using the eyesontherise app).

 

  • Walk up to the “Do Not Open” wall in the exhibit.
  • Close your eyes: Imagine your city in the future. Imagine how rising seas will impact it and those who will live here then.
  • Think about what you would like them to know. Think about what you believe someone living in 2041, 2066, 2116 or 2216 will need to hear from someone living in 2016.
  • Unclip a blank piece of paper and envelope from the wall and use a pencil to write it all down:  Tell them who you are. Tell them why you are writing to them. Sign it. Date it.
  • Fold the letter in two, kiss it, place it in the envelope and seal it.
  • On the outside of the envelope write only one of these four phrases:

“DO NOT OPEN: 25 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 50 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 100 years”
or
“DO NOT OPEN: 200 years”

  • Clip the sealed envelope to the “Do Not Open” wall with the words facing out.
  • Stare at your envelope for 25 seconds, 50 seconds, 100 seconds, or 200 seconds.
  • Think of how your words will be received in the future.
  • Walk away

Earlier Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

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Diatoms exhibit at Cortada Art Studio Gallery

Cortada’s one-hundred diatom works on tile (each 6″ x 6″), 2017.

Diatoms

on exhibit at

Cortada Art Studio Gallery
in the
Bird Road Art District
4664 SW 75th Avenue
Miami, FL 33155

By appointment: 305-858-1323

Xavier Cortada will be exhibiting a series of ceramic and tile works depicting diatoms.

Diatoms are single-celled organisms that live in the water and harness the power of the sun to convert CO2 into oxygen. Its glass shell, all that remains from the diatom, is used by scientists today to see what was as they research environmental issues crucial to the city in the century to come. Scientists—and artists—can determine the past salinity of water by examining the shells of diatoms preserved in sedimentary core samples. Each diatom species has a different salinity preference, so changes in the mixture of fresh and sea water (driven by sea level and changes in water management) can be inferred from past diatom remains.

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Tursiocola ziemanii,” 6″ x 6″, ceramic tile, 2017.  Learn more #diatom #art #tiledrawing

 

 

Xavier Cortada, 7. Azul B, framed bas relief ceramic sculpture, 7.5”x7.75”, 2017

 

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Paragon,” framed bas relief ceramic sculpture, 11”x7.5”, 2017.

 

 

Special thanks to Cerda, Llanos y Cia., Inc. for being the January 19th opening reception‘s wine sponsor.

CLIMA 2016: DO NOT OPEN

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

CLIMA 2016: DO NOT OPEN
DO NOT OPEN:  Poem | Participant Instructions

Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment
Hialeah Seniors

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Xavier Cortada, "Testamento," archival ink on aluminum, 2015

Xavier Cortada, “Testamento,” archival ink on aluminum, 2015

CLIMA 2016 | Opening Reception

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

CLIMA OPENING RECEPTION:
Friday, December 2nd, 2016 at 7pm
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

clima-opening-night-3

CLIMA 2016 in Hialeah during Art Basel week

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

clima-poster-all-events-3clima2016events

 

Xavier Cortada will return to Hialeah for CLIMA 2016 during 2016 Art Basel Week  with the opening of several of his art-science exhibits:

CLIMA presenting partner Honoring the Future brings the work of Philadelphia-based artists Peter Handler and Karen Singer (Alaskan Journey: Artists Bear Witness to Climate Change.)

CLIMA is also honored to present the work of its 2016 featured local guest artist, Michael Gray.  Gray, an MFA student at FIU, will be presenting his Phyllum Floridian exhibit and contribute works to Cortada’s project on climate refugees.

 

Xavier Cortada, "Flora (sin titulo)" archival ink on aluminum, 36" x 27", (edition 1 of 5), 2015

Xavier Cortada, “Flora (sin titulo)” archival ink on aluminum, 36″ x 27″, (edition 1 of 5), 2015


 

 


Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest:
CLIMA 2016 will feature Cortada’s “Water Paintings” and the Water Visualization created at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest:

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CLIMA 2015 featured Cortada’s “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas”

Xavier Cortada, "Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: FREEZE IT!," video sreen shot, 2015. In acknowledgement of the support of the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: FREEZE IT!,” video sreen shot, 2015. In acknowledgement of the support of the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

 

CLIMA 2015: Main | Statement | Gallery | Press | Events | Livestream

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An Emotional Lexicon for Climate Change: WONDER, DENIAL, DISAPPOINTMENT, GRIEF, and HOPE

fragile habitat vizcaya

house-gardens-and-collections-landing-page

AN EMOTIONAL LEXICON FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

6:30PM 

WONDER, DENIAL, DISAPPOINTMENT, GRIEF, AND HOPE

 6:30PM – Reception, Event at 7:00PM

Vizcaya Museum & Gardens.

Reflect with local environmental humanities scholars on how arts and culture can help us understand the feelings we might have as we think about climate change.

 

A PUBLIC EVENT SERIES
BRINGING MIAMI TOGETHER TO
DISCUSS OUR FUTURE
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Organized by the Department of History of the Green School of International and Public Affairs, Florida International University in collaboration with HistoryMiami Museum, The Kampong, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, The Wolfsonian-FIU, Miami Dade County Public Schools’ Department of Social Sciences, the FIU Green Library Digital Collections Center, and Catalyst Miami

Made possible in part by a major grant from the Humanities in the Public Square Initiative of The National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating 50 Years of Excellence

Explore the challenges Miami faces from climate change through culture and history. Join nationally recognized scholars and local environmentalists for stories about our connections to this unique and fragile landscape. How can we come together to imagine our future and prioritize what is most valuable, just, and worthy of preservation?

For more information about the NEH-funded Ecohumanities for Cities in Crisis Event Series, please see ecohumanities.fiu.edu