Celebrating the 2018 Seasons: Longitudinal Installation Winter Solstice performance

Welcoming the 2018 Seasons… Winter Solstice

Xavier Cortada. “Longitudinal Installation,” South Pole (2007) and North Pole (2008).

 

Please join us for the performance of the Longitudinal Installation as we greet each new season

Winter Solstice

LONGITUDINAL INSTALLATION
Xavier Cortada

Friday, December 21, 2018 at 10:30am

at

Pinecrest Gardens
11000 SW 57th Avenue
Pinecrest, FL 33156

The participatory art piece captures voices from 24 individual across the globe who have been impacted by Climate Change.

The event is free and open to the public.
For more info call 305-669-6990 or visit

Learn more at www.longitudinalinstallation.org

 

 

Longitudinal Installation

The Longitudinal Installation at In the Garden Pinecrest Gardens:

Cortada created the Longitudinal Installation in the South Pole in 2007 and in the North Pole in 2008. During both visits, Cortada placed 24 shoes in a circle, each aligned across 24 longitudes. He stopped in front of each of his longitudinal shoe markers and read a quote aloud that revealed a person’s experience with climate change from that part of the world. His artistic ritual illustrated how everyone in the world has been profoundly impacted by climate change.

The South Pole’s Longitudinal Installation has been replicated as a ceramic sculpture on permanent exhibit at Pinecrest Gardens. This participatory art installation invites visitors to recite the 24 quotes, as Cortada did at both ends of the world.

To perform the ritual, stand behind the show marked with zero degrees and face the red and white pole as you read the first quote. (You can find the quotes online at www.longitudinalinstallation.org.) Then, move clockwise, stopping at each marked shoe to read its respective quote. Upon completion, stand just to the left of the 75 degree West shoe (if you live in Florida) and recite a 25th quote: Your own quote!

How has climate change impacted your environment?

If you perform the ritual, we invite you to document the performance with photos and video, and upload it to www.longitudinalinstallation.org

 

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007

Greeting each new season in 2019

Please join us In the Garden at Pinecrest Gardens for the performance of the Longitudinal Installation as we greet each new season:

Aside from his ongoing Florida is Nature project and the Longitudinal Installation, Pinecrest Gardens artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada is creating other permanent participatory art projects and ritualistic installations onsite at Pinecrest Gardens, South Florida’s Cultural Arts Park.  To schedule an environmental art-based field trip for your classroom or co-op, please contact Lacey Bray, educational programs coordinator, at lbray@pinecrest-fl.gov.  Pinecrest Gardens is located at 11000 SW 57th Avenue, Pinecrest, FL.

Welcoming the Seasons: Longitudinal Installation Fall Equinox performance

Welcoming the 2018 Seasons… Fall Equinox

Xavier Cortada. “Longitudinal Installation,” South Pole (2007) and North Pole (2008).

 

Please join us for the performance of the Longitudinal Installation as we greet each new season

Fall Equinox

LONGITUDINAL INSTALLATION
Xavier Cortada

Sunday, September  23, 2018 at 10:30am

at

Pinecrest Gardens
11000 SW 57th Avenue
Pinecrest, FL 33156

The participatory art piece captures voices from 24 individual across the globe who have been impacted by Climate Change.

The event is free and open to the public.
For more info call 305-669-6990 or visit

Learn more at www.longitudinalinstallation.org

 

 

Longitudinal Installation

The Longitudinal Installation at In the Garden Pinecrest Gardens: Cortada created the Longitudinal Installation in the South Pole in 2007 and in the North Pole in 2008. During both visits, Cortada placed 24 shoes in a circle, each aligned across 24 longitudes. He stopped in front of each of his longitudinal shoe markers and read a quote aloud that revealed a person’s experience with climate change from that part of the world. His artistic ritual illustrated how everyone in the world has been profoundly impacted by climate change.

In the Garden:
The South Pole’s Longitudinal Installation has been replicated as a ceramic sculpture on permanent exhibit at Pinecrest Gardens. This participatory art installation invites visitors to recite the 24 quotes, as Cortada did at both ends of the world.

To perform the ritual, stand behind the show marked with zero degrees and face the red and white pole as you read the first quote. (You can find the quotes online at www.longitudinalinstallation.org.) Then, move clockwise, stopping at each marked shoe to read its respective quote. Upon completion, stand just to the right of the 75 degree West shoe (if you live in Florida) and recite a 25th quote: Your own quote!

25th quote: How has climate change impacted your environment?
If you perform the ritual, we invite you to document the performance with photos and video, and upload it to www.longitudinalinstallation.org

 

Greeting each new season

Please join us In the Garden at Pinecrest Gardens for the performance of the Longitudinal Installation as we greet each new season:

Aside from his ongoing Florida is Nature project and the Longitudinal Installation, Pinecrest Gardens artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada is creating other permanent participatory art projects and ritualistic installations onsite at Pinecrest Gardens, South Florida’s Cultural Arts Park.  

To schedule an environmental art-based field trip for your classroom or co-op, please contact Lacey Bray, educational programs coordinator, at lbray@pinecrest-fl.gov.  Pinecrest Gardens is located at 11000 SW 57th Avenue, Pinecrest, FL.

Cortada’s “Endangered World: BNP & 80.15W” exhibition celebrates 50th anniversary of our “Underwater” Park!

 

Endangered World: Biscayne National Park

and

80.15 W

a solo exhibition by

Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

 

Join us in welcoming special guest Gary Bremen, Biscayne National Park Ranger during our opening reception on Sunday, August 12, 2018 from noon to 2pm.

Exhibition runs through August 8, 2018 through September 3, 2018

 

 

 

Xavier Cortada (with the participation of 359 collaborators), “Endangered World: Biscayne National Park,” 360 individually painted flags flying along a mile-long, site-specific participatory art installation across the national park, 2010. (http://endangeredworld.org/biscayne-national-park/)

Exhibition celebrates the celebrates the 50th anniversary of Biscayne National Park

Endangered World: Biscayne National Park: Conceptualized by Cortada, the outdoor installation features 360 brightly colored flags lining Convoy Point’s roads and trails for over a mile. Each flag represents one degree of the planet’s longitude, and 360 individuals and organizations from throughout South Florida decorated the flags with an image of an endangered or threatened animal that lives at that longitude. Participants also committed to an “eco-action” that directly or indirectly mitigates the plight of that animal. (Learn more at http://endangeredworld.org/biscayne-national-park)

80.15 W: In contrast to the exuberance of the outdoor installation is 80.15 W inside the Dante Fascell Visitor Center Gallery. Here, Cortada has created 17 somber works on paper that feature the 17 threatened and endangered species that call Biscayne National Park home. The exhibit is titled for the longitude where the Visitor Center sits to tie it in to the larger installation outside. The pieces were created using reused carbon paper, a metaphor for the impact (or “carbon footprint”) that humans have had on that animal. (Learn more at http://cortada.com/2010/80.15W)

Biscayne National Park:

In 1968, plans for southern Biscayne Bay included a major petrochemical plant necessitating digging a 40-foot deep channel across the bay for 7 miles in an area that naturally averages 6-8 feet deep. That channel was to conyinue beyond the northern Keys, through the shallow coral reefs, out to deep water. At the same time, plan were afoot to establish the City of Islandia, consisting of the northernmost islands of the Florida Keys (those north of Key Largo). The city was to include single-family and high rise living, bridges, streets, an amusement park and more. A small, but vocal and incredibly persistent, group of citizens fought these plans, and proposed the creation of a national park unlike any other…one covered mostly by water. Fifty years later, Biscayne National Park celebrates its Golden Anniversary as the largest marine park in the National Park System, protecting mangrove forests, shallow bay waters, the undeveloped Florida Keys, coral reefs and evidence of 10,000 years of human history, all within sight of downtown Miami.

The park preserves Biscayne Bay and its offshore barrier reefs. Ninety-five percent of the park is water, and the shore of the bay is the location of an extensive mangrove forest. The park covers 172,971 acres (69,999 ha) and includes Elliott Key, the park’s largest island and first of the true Florida Keys, formed from fossilized coral reef.  The park is home to an incredible diversity of animals and plants including over 600 native fish, neo-tropical water birds and migratory habitat, and threatened and endangered species including sea turtles, manatees, the Schaus’ swallowtail butterfly and Florida semaphore cactus. Some animals and plants are in the northern limits of their ranges.Biscayne National Park is a very diverse place. Four distinct ecosystems melt into one another creating rich edge communities or “ecotones.” These edges support an incredible array of wildlife, including hundreds of species of colorful fish, plants found nowhere else in the United States, and visitor favorites like pelicans, manatees and sea turtles. Winds, currents, storms and the park’s close proximity to one of the nation’s largest urban areas means that the entire park is in a constant state of flux — ever-changing in the face of new challenges posed by the constant cycle of building and destruction. (Learn more about Biscayne National Park at https://www.nps.gov/bisc/index.htm)

 

 

Xavier Cortada “(80.15 W:) Hawksbill Sea Turtle” Archival ink on paper (generated from drawings created on 11” x 8.5” carbon paper) Signed, numbered, limited edition (edition of 5), 16” x 12” 2010

 

Titled for Biscayne Bay’s longitude, “80.15 W” features the 17 threatened and endangered species that call Biscayne National Park (in Miami, FL) home. In 2010, Cortada created the drawings on carbon paper, a metaphor for the impact (or “carbon footprint”) that humans have had on that animal, even across the boundaries of protected nature preserve. The carbon paper originals were premiered at the national park’s gallery and are in the permanent collection of NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

Native Flags: 9th Annual Earth Day Celebration in every Miami-Dade County public school

On April 7th, 2010, students from Filer Middle School in Hialeah planted a sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera) and Native Flag on campus and adopted their own buttonwood and firebush trees/flags to plant at their homes. See www.nativeflags.org. 

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Celebrates Earth Day 2018

At its meeting of February 21, 2018 the School Board approved Board Item H-4 proffered by School Board Member Perla Tabares Hantman, endorsing April 22, 2018 as Earth Day in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

For the ninth year in a row, we are proud to again partner with local artist Xavier Cortada and local organizations on an Earth Day project through which all schools will be able to plant a native tree on campus, together with the symbolic posting of a land reclamation flag. Other partners in this native tree canopy enhancement project include Florida International University College of Arts, Sciences & Education (CASE)│School of Environment, Arts and Society (SEAS), FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA), FIU Libraries│Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), Pinecrest Gardens, Frost Science, and the Deering Estate. In addition, students will be afforded the opportunity to interpret Earth Day by designing their own flag.

Celebrations are scheduled as follows on Thursday, April 19, 2018 at two featured public schools:

  • Gulfstream Elementary
    20900 SW 97th Avenue
    Cutler Bay, Florida  33189
    Phone: (305) 235- 6811
    Time: 9:00 am
  • Citrus Grove Elementary
    2121 NW 5th Street
    Miami, Florida 33125
    Phone: (305) 642-4141
    Time: 1:30 pm

Starting on April 19th photos of the tree planting and flag posting activities can be uploaded by the schools at: http://nativeflags.org/participant-upload/

For more information on this year’s Earth Day celebration or the land reclamation project go to www.NativeFlags.org or call 305-995-4646.

 

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags: North Pole,” 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation” during Power of Arts Museum at Sweetwater

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation”

 

 

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007

Longitudinal Installation,” created by Cortada a decade ago as part of his NSF Antarctic Artists and Writers Program residency in Antarctica, will be performed by Sweetwater Elementary School students on May 24th at 7 pm.  The performance and activity is co-presented by the Reclamation Projects with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

Participate by following these steps:

1. Find a group of 24 people to perform the Longitudinal Installation ritual with and engage in the performance.
Click here to download instructions.

2. Document the performance with photos and video.

3. Upload photo on www.facebook.com/longitudinalinstallation

4.  Add the “25th quote.”

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007 (Listen: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.xaviercortada.com/resource/resmgr/longitudinal_installation_no.mp3)

24 Global Voices

longitude11x17_graphicThese quotes taken from newspapers across 24 time zones that talking about the impact of climate change on that individual’s life. After Xavier Cortada completed the Longitudinal Installation at the South Pole, he walked to the 0 degree longitude, the prime meridian, and walked clockwise around the pole. He stopped at each shoe to recite each of the following quotes:

 

0°, Spain:
“There may be a move of wineries into the Pyrenees in the future.”
— Xavier Sort, technical director of Miguel Torres Wineries.

15° E, Switzerland:
“Losses to insurers from environmental events have risen exponentially over the past 30 years, and are expected to rise even more rapidly still.”
— Pamela Heck, Insurance Industry Expert.

30° E, Zimbabwe:
“We used to be able to grow everything we want but that has all changed.”
— Matsapi Nyathi, Grandmother.

45° E, Turkey:
“We are helpless. We’re trying to rescue trapped people while also trying to evacuate flood waters that have inundated hundreds of houses.”
— Muharrem Ergul, Mayor, Beykoz district of Istanbul.

60° E, Iran:
“More than 90 percent of our wetlands have completely dried up.”
— Alamdar Alamdari, environmental researcher, Fars Province.

75° E, Maldives:
“In the worst case scenario, we’ll have to move.”
— Foreign Ministry spokesman Ahmed Shaheed.

90° E, Tibet, China:
“The Sherpas of Khumbu may not know everything, but they are suffering the consequences of the people’s greed. We mountain people should be careful and take precautions. If we don’t save Khumbu today our fresh water will dry up and the problem will be impossible to solve in the future.”
— Ngawang Tenzing Jangpo, the Abbot of Tengboche monastery.

105° E, Borneo, Indonesia:
“There’s been no rain, it’s horrible. The governor’s office has instructed schools and offices to close until further notice.”
— Hidayat, government official.

120° E, Philippines:
“The disaster covered almost every corner of this province – rampaging floods, falling trees, damaged houses. It happened very rapidly and many people did not expect this because they haven’t experienced mud flows in those areas before.”
— Fernando Gonzalez, governor of Albay province.

135° E, Japan:
“It’s no exaggeration to say that Japan faces a critical situation when describing the rapid decline of marine supply in its domestic waters that is linked to seaweed loss. Tengusa (seaweed) provides food for marine species.”
— Tomohiro Takase, head of the fisheries department at the Hachijojima municipality.

150° E, Great Barrier Reef, Australia:
“In 20 years’ time, bleaching is highly likely to be annual and that will cause shallow-water corals to be in decline. We need to start working out how we can help people who rely on it for their income. It’s really quite a stunning fact.”
— Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, director of the Centre for Marine Studies at the University of Queensland.

165° E, Micronesia:
“We have nowhere to go.”
— Ben Namakin, Environmental Educator.

180°, Tuvalu: “Tuvalu is the first victim of global warming.”
— Koloa Talake, former prime minister.

165° W , Niue: “Yesterday morning we woke up to a scene of so much devastation, it was just unbelievable. Cyclone Heta was just so fast, furious and ruthless.”
— Cecelia Talagi, Government Secretary.

150° W, Alaska, USA:
“We are at a crossroads. . . Is it practical to stand and fight our Mother Ocean? Or do we surrender and move?”
— Shishmaref Mayor Edith Vorderstrasse.

135° W, Yukon, Canada:
“The weather is really unpredictable and the ice freezes much later and breaks up earlier. There are more incidents of hunters falling through the ice.”
— Kik Shappa, Hunter, Griese Fiord, Canada.

120° W Nunavut, Canada:
“Our cultural heritage is at stake here. We are an adaptable people. We have over the millennium been able to adapt to incredible circumstances. But I think adaptability has its limits. If the ice is not forming, how else does one adapt to seasons that are not as they used to be when the whole environment is changing underneath our feet, literally?”
— Sheila Watt-Cloutier, president of the circumpolar conference.

105° W, Colorado, USA:
“In Colorado, climate change means less snow, less water, more wildfires, less biodiversity and less economic opportunity, as there is less water available for development.”
— Stephen Saunders, president, Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.

90° W, Nicaragua:
“I closed my eyes and prayed to God.”
— Mariana González, Hurricane Mitch survivor.

75° W, Peru:
“I tell my wife the day that mountain loses its snow, we will have to move out of the valley.”
— Jose Ignacio Lambarri, farmer, Urubamba Valley.

60° W, Argentina:
“The flooding has forced us to redesign routes. We thought it would be for a short period of time, but it has been almost six years.”
— Carlos Avellaneda, manager of a trucking company.

45° W, Brazil:
“I am very frightened. One thing goes wrong, and the entire system follows.”
— Jair Souto, Mayor of Manaquiri.

30° W, Greenland:
“They tell us that we must not eat mattak [whale blubber], but this is all we know. Eating Inughuit food makes us who we are, and anyway we have nothing else to eat!”
— Tekummeq, Town of Qaanaaq.

15° W, Maurtitania:
“We are only eating one meal a day. When there is not enough food, it is the young and the old that get fed first.”
— Fatimitu Mint Eletou, Bouchamo.


Seahorse Society at Sweetwater Elementary School

 

Sweetwater Elementary students to join the Seahorse Society 

Xavier Cortada, “Hippocampus,” 48″ x 24″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada to present an educational event at Sweetwater Elementary school on May 2nd, 2017. We will be teaching students about Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!  Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida and discuss the educational and research efforts conducted by her international group (see www.projectseahorse.org).  Students will also participate in a collaborative art project culminating in an installation that captures their pledge to protect them.  At the end of the event, students will be inducted into the Seahorse Society.  The performance and activity is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

 

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens Earth Day Festival

 

Reclamation Projects to celebrate Earth Day 2017
by implementing Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada for a community event at Pinecrest Gardens this #EarthDay Weekend. We will be engaging visitors with Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!

 

Seahorse Society is a participatory art project by Xavier Cortada.  It promotes the educational and research efforts of www.projectseahorse.org

Join us at the Historic Entrance Gallery at Pinecrest Gardens on Earth Day Festival and learn about seahorses. Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will be there to discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida. Kids will be able draw seahorses and take a pledge to protect them.

The Seahorse Society activity at Pinecrest Gardens during the Earth Day Festival is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

Platform 450: Curator and Artist Tour

 

PLATFORM 450

The Deering Spring Contemporary exhibition PLATFORM 450 showcases site-specific works produced through a range of multidisciplinary art practices in virtual reality, 3-D modeling, and new media. Through data collection and investigation, this year’s presenting artists responded to the 450 acres of the Deering Estate.

PLATFORM 450 OPENING

Historic homes and grounds

3:30 pm – 10:00 pm

CURATOR & ARTIST TOUR

A walking tour of the indoor and outdoor exhibits with presenting artists and Curator Kim Yantis

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Presenting Artists: Priscilla Aleman, Archival Feedback: Thom Wheeler Castillo and Emile Milgrim, Dan Alvarez, Willie Avendano, John William Bailly, Frida Baranek, O’Neal Bardin III, Xavier Cortada, Mark Diamond, Eddie Dominguez, Maxwell Hartley, Home Eleven: Nelly Bonilla and Oscar Luna, Ian Honoré, Peter Hosfeld, Carol Jazzar, Charles Lindsay, Richard Medlock, Luciano Rabuske, Gretchen Scharnagl, Skip Snow, Kyle Towbridge, Freda Tschumy, Keith Waddington.

For full listing of Symposium and Playwright participants see www.DeeringEstate.org.

With the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and The Deering Estate Foundation, Inc.

To request materials in accessible format, sign language interpreters, and/or any accommodation to participate in any Miami-Dade Parks sponsored program or meeting, contact Mary Palacios, 305-755-7848 or Mary.Palacios@miamidade.gov at least 7 days in advance to initiate your request. TTY users may also call 711 (Florida Relay Service).

Sweetwater Elementary to grow FLOR500 wildflowers in every student’s home

 

FLOR500 | Sweetwater
Miami artist Xavier Cortada will lead Sweetwater Elementary School students in creating a participatory eco-art project in support of the pollinators.  Inspired by his FLOR500 project (www.flor500.com), kids at the school will plant wildflower seeds to grow in their classroom.  Each student will have a cup with their name on it.  Each student will also create a hand-painted flag celebrating Earth Day.  Once sprouted, the student will take the wildflower plants home and plant them alongside their flags.  Planting the flag, they will become reverse conquistadores, returning a patch of land back to nature.

The first garden (see photo above) featured Coreopsis lanceolata, the official state wildflower. It was planted in front of the Museum of Florida History in Tallahassee, FL on March 22, 2012 and dedicated to Florida’s indigenous people.

 

“Each of us has a role in helping shape Florida’s natural history,” said Cortada.  “We can help reclaim nature, one yard at a time, by planting wildflower gardens to support our pollinators.”  Cortada hopes his art piece will help educate individuals about the importance of Florida’s ecosystems and encourage better environmental stewardship.  This FLOR500 | Sweetwater participatory eco-art project at Sweetwater Elementary School is presented by FIU Frost Art Museum, FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Sciences & Education, the FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts, and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

 FLOR500 is a participatory art, nature, and history project created by Miami artist Xavier Cortada to commemorate Florida’s quincentennial in 2013. The project marks the importance of the moment when the history of our state changed forever and gives us a glimpse of what its landscape was like 500 years ago.
500 flowers
A team of scientists selected the 500 native flowers-  the same ones that grew in our state when Juan Ponce de Leon landed in 1513 and named it “La Florida”–from “flor,” the Spanish word for flower.
500 artists
Five hundred Floridians were then invited to depict 500 native wildflowers. The artwork, along with information about each flower, will be posted on the project website (www.FLOR500.com).500 gardens
A team of historians selected individuals who helped shape Florida history.  Florida schools and libraries (across the 67 counties and 8 regions) are encouraged to plant 500 wildflower gardens, dedicating them to one of 500 important Floridians selected by a team of historians.  These 500 new native habitats will help support Florida’s biodiversity.

Wildflowers, with help of their pollinators, help make Earth verdant:  Plant life sustains all animals (including humans) and balance atmospheric gases (that accelerate global climate change). Wildflowers would naturally continue to blanket our planet were it not for the displacement caused by the concrete we’ve poured ‐‐ and the parcels we’ve platted ‐‐ to build our homes and grow our society. Help reverse the trend:  Show us your wild side. Plant wildflowers in your yard.”
— Xavier Cortada

About the Artist: 

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Sciences & Education  and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art efforts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

Fore more info visit http://www.cortada.com

Native Flags: 8th Annual Earth Day Celebration in every Miami-Dade public school

 

On April 20th, 2017, MDCPS School Board Chair Larry Feldman helps Miami Sunset Senior High School students plant a live oak on their campus.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Celebrates Earth Day 2017

At its meeting of February 15, 2017 the School Board approved Board Item H-4 proffered by School Board Member Perla Tabares Hantman, endorsing April 22, 2017 as Earth Day in Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

For the eighth year in a row, we are proud to again partner with local artist Xavier Cortada and local organizations on an Earth Day project through which all schools will be able to plant a native tree on campus, together with the symbolic posting of a land reclamation flag. Other partners in this native tree canopy enhancement project include FIU College of Arts, Sciences & Education│School of Environment, Arts and Society, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts, FIU Libraries│Digital Library of the Caribbean, Pinecrest Gardens, Frost Science, and the Deering Estate. In addition, students will be afforded the opportunity to interpret Earth Day by designing their own flag.

Starting on April 22nd photos of the tree planting and flag posting activities can be uploaded by the schools at: http://nativeflags.org/participate/upload/

For more information on this year’s Earth Day celebration or the land reclamation project go to www.NativeFlags.org or call 305-995-4646.

 

Celebrations are scheduled for Thursday April 20th, 2017 as follows:

 

8:30 am Ceremony –      Joella C. Good Elementary School

                                                6350 ZNW 188th Terrace

                                                Miami, Florida 33015

                                                Phone: 305-625-2008

10:30 am Ceremony –     Miami Sunset Senior High School

                                                13125 SW 72 Street

                                                Miami, Florida 33183

                                                Phone: 305-385-4255

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags: North Pole,” 2008.