“Florida is…” on exhibit at top of State’s Capitol

“Florida Is…” by Xavier Cortada

Conceptualized during Xavier Cortada‘s residency at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artist Residency in Captiva, Florida, “Florida is…” is an evolving body of work that depicts the natural beauty of Florida.  It asks Floridians to define their state by its actual nature, not by things we do and build to displace it.  Some “Florida is…” works hang as public art in public venues, admonishing viewers to find better ways to coexist with nature.

The project invites participants to capture and share their images and perspectives on the project’s online platform.

 

You are cordially invited to

Florida is…

a solo show by

Xavier Cortada

at

22nd Floor Gallery
State Capitol
Tallahassee, FL

Exhibit runs December 1st,  2018 through March 31st, 2019

 

PARTICIPATE: Help others understand and appreciate Florida’s natural beauty.  Upload an image of your favorite animal, plant or place to www.floridaisnature.com and tell us why we should all care for it and strive to protect it.  We will share it on our website and social media.  We will also ask you to help us spread the word and get others to see that “Florida is… Nature.”

Xavier Cortada, “(Florida is…) Wood storks,” archival ink on aluminum, 60″ x 40”, 2016 (www.floridaisnature.com)

About Florida Is Nature

Conceptualized during Xavier Cortada‘s residency at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artist Residency in Captiva, Florida, “Florida is…” is an evolving body of work that depicts the natural beauty of Florida.  It asks Floridians to define their state by its actual nature, not by things we do and build to displace it.  Some “Florida is…” works hang as public art in public venues, admonishing viewers to find better ways to coexist with nature.

The project invites participants to capture and share their images and perspectives on the project’s online platform.

In 2015, Cortada created three permanent “Florida is” public art installations in three turnpike plazas, making them cultural destinations in and of themselves.  Each focused on a different aspect of the sunshine state’s natural beauty:  Endangered Animals  (Ft. Drum Plaza),  Diatoms  (Turkey Lake Plaza), and Wildflowers (West Palm Beach Plaza).

“It is important to have the artwork connect with our local environment, and I believe that [Cortada’s] art does that in a very sophisticated way,” said architect Bernard Zyscovich in reviewing Cortada’s public art proposal for the plazas he designed. “Additionally, I love the idea of generating a series of “take aways” from [Cortada’s art] plazas and hopefully from the other plazas as well.  I think that it reinforces the plaza experience as something that adds value to each visitor’s experience.“

Merchandise  is branded with “Florida is” information so that it serves as a catalysts for conversations to address our state’s environmental concerns.

You can learn more about the artist by visiting www.cortada.com

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“Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy…”

In 2005, I was asked to create the 2006 Florida Heritage Month poster.  I was charged with depicting the 5 flags that flew over my home state since Europeans made contact.  Every fourth-grade classroom was to receive the poster.  Instead of painting a Confederate flag, I chose to depict the demise of the Confederacy.

Below is the statement that I wrote then.  It was printed on the back side of every poster.

Xavier Cortada, “Five Flags / Florida,” 61.5″ x 96″, acrylic on canvas, 2005 “Five Flags/Florida” (Cortada’s “Five Flags / Florida” is In the collection of the Florida Department of State, commissioned for the 2006 Florida Heritage Month Commemorative Poster.)

 

“Five Flags/Florida” (2006)

Miami artist Xavier Cortada utilized the Florida coastline to depict its heritage: each wave represents a new wave of immigrants who set roots and established communities. The mangrove roots metaphorically depict our interconnectedness as people who share a rich and diverse cultural history.

The mangrove root on the left symbolizes Florida’s indigenous people. The two clusters of clouds above mark their first encounter with Europeans: Juan Ponce de Leon’s landing in 1513.

Each of the mangrove plants rising above the horizon represent the five flags that have since flown over the peninsula:

The first plant has two sets of leaves representing Spain’s two periods of control: 1513-1763 and 1784-1821. The leaves on the second plant resemble the fleur-de-lis on the French flag when it was flown over Florida during 1564-65. Great Britain’s reign over Florida, 1763-1784, is shown as a mangrove plant with sliced leaves as it divided the territory into East Florida and West Florida. As the war for American independence ended, all of the territory was returned to the Spanish.

In 1821, the United States bought Florida from Spain for $5 million. The fourth plant represents the American flag. Back then the American flag had 24 stars. That number grew by three when Florida became the 27th state in 1845. The plant is bifurcated because Florida split from the Union in 1861 to join the Confederacy. After the Confederacy was defeated, Florida returned to the Union at the end of the Civil War in 1865. Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy.

The mangrove root on the right honors those whose search for freedom (e.g.: Seminoles, slaves using the Underground Railroad, Holocaust survivors, Cuban exiles, and Haitian refugees among others) brought them to Florida’s shores.

The painting, “Five Flags/Florida,” was created by Mr. Cortada for Florida Heritage Month 2006.

 

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450” exhibit

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada
will be exhibiting his Native Flags project (www.nativeflags.org)
and his 2015 work, 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas.
at

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450”

An international symposium and curated exhibit focused on the intersection of science and art.
Exhibit & Special Event on Saturday, April 22, 2017
3:30 pm -10:00 pm; Free and open to the public
Exhibit on display from April 9 – June 26, 2017

 

HIT IT: Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it!,” video screen shot, 2015.
In acknowledgement of the support from the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

 

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it! | Burn it! | Eat it! | Freeze itBury it! video documentation of performance, 2015
Xavier Cortada

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas was created by Xavier Cortada during April-May 2015 during an artist residency at the Rising Seas Confab 2015, Rauschenberg Studio, Captiva, Florida. In this performance, Cortada comments with irony on the weak to non-existent actions being taken to address both the causes and the imminent realities of climate disruption in a State clearly at the epicenter of potential disaster—one which has been caused by inadequate action globally on soaring levels of greenhouse gases related to human activity.

Cortada has long been involved in art that intervenes in, and/or comments upon environmental problems. He has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Poleand direct-impact ecological art projects, in Florida, around the US, and internationally, (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland).

Xavier Cortada is Florida-educated and has lived in Miami since he was three. He is currently Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Science & Education and the College of Communication, Architecture + the Arts. (http://www.cortada.com)

 

ABOUT DEERING ESTATE:

The Deering Estate offers complimentary exhibit evenings, highlighting a variety of contemporary, historic, and visiting exhibitions inside the historic homes. Exhibit Evenings are free of charge and offer the public a chance to interact with artists and curators and to experience a variety of exhibit tours and talks. Exhibit Evenings are held from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, unless otherwise noted. Exhibit on view daily, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Free with Estate Admission.

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy presents “DO NOT OPEN” performance

 

Contact: Jennifer Rennicks, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Alissa@cleanenergy.org, 954-734-3773

 

ADVISORY: Miami Community Leaders, Elected Officials, and Artist, Join in Interactive Art Installation

to Highlight Sea Level Rise and Uncertain Future of South Florida

Event emphasizes climate action uncertainty as President-Elect Trump is inaugurated

 

Miami, Fla. – One day before the inauguration of climate change denier President-Elect Trump, Miami-based and globally featured artist Xavier Cortada will host a live performance as a portion of his ongoing research driven art, CLIMA 2016. The interactive exhibit “Do Not Open” invites participants to imagine the future of South Florida, its communities, and the effects of sea level rise, writing letters to future Floridians placed in a time capsule. 

When: January 19th at 7:00 PM

Where: Cortada Art Studio Gallery, 4664 SW 75th Avenue, Miami, FL 33155

Who:

  • Xavier Cortada
  • Elected Officials
  • Community Leaders
  • South Florida Residents

What: The event, through art, will draw attention to the challenge of climate change impacts to South Florida and the need for more action now. This is an especially critical and timely message as the event is being held only one day before the inauguration of a new president who vocally denies climate change and its effects already being felt by communities throughout the world. The Do Not Open art installation is a time capsule to capture written messages/letters that will be added to the exhibit by Xavier Cortada. The performance also coincides with the full gallery opening featuring a series of ceramic and tile works.

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Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.

DO NOT OPEN:  Participant Instructions | Artist’s Poem

City of Sweetwater submerged beneath a 6 foot sea level rise.

Submerged: City of Sweetwater beneath a 6-foot rise in sea level (using the eyesontherise app).

 

  • Walk up to the “Do Not Open” wall in the exhibit.
  • Close your eyes: Imagine your city in the future. Imagine how rising seas will impact it and those who will live here then.
  • Think about what you would like them to know. Think about what you believe someone living in 2041, 2066, 2116 or 2216 will need to hear from someone living in 2016.
  • Unclip a blank piece of paper and envelope from the wall and use a pencil to write it all down:  Tell them who you are. Tell them why you are writing to them. Sign it. Date it.
  • Fold the letter in two, kiss it, place it in the envelope and seal it.
  • On the outside of the envelope write only one of these four phrases:

“DO NOT OPEN: 25 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 50 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 100 years”
or
“DO NOT OPEN: 200 years”

  • Clip the sealed envelope to the “Do Not Open” wall with the words facing out.
  • Stare at your envelope for 25 seconds, 50 seconds, 100 seconds, or 200 seconds.
  • Think of how your words will be received in the future.
  • Walk away

Earlier Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

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CLIMA 2016: DO NOT OPEN

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

CLIMA 2016: DO NOT OPEN
DO NOT OPEN:  Poem | Participant Instructions

Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment
Hialeah Seniors

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Xavier Cortada, "Testamento," archival ink on aluminum, 2015

Xavier Cortada, “Testamento,” archival ink on aluminum, 2015

CLIMA 2016 Panel: The Art of Climate Change

clima-web-logoCLIMA Home | Main 2016 | Gallery | Statement | PressEvents | Livestream

Cortada worksDo Not Open | Climate Refugees | Hot for Hialeah | Psychoanalysis of Climate ChangeReclamation Project | Flor 500
LTER : Everglades (Florida) | HJ Andrews (Oregon) | Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire)

CLIMA Panel: The Art of Climate Change
Tuesday, December 6th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

 

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Moderator:  Dean Brian Schriner, Dean, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts

Xavier Cortada, Artist-in-Residence, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts and School of Environment, Art and Society
Micheal Gray, MFA candidate in Visual Arts: Studio Practice, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts
Miriam Machado, Education Curator, FIU Frost Art Museum

Art Presentation: Let the Sunshine in Pinecrest, Palmetto Bay & Cutler Bay | Vote NO on Amendment 1

 

 Let the Sunshine in-5

Let the Sunshine in-1 Let the Sunshine in-3 Let the Sunshine in-2

“Let the sunshine in…”
Xavier Cortada

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Xavier Cortada, “Vote NO on 1,” oil on solar panel, 2016

Art Presentation: Let the Sunshine in Pinecrest, Palmetto Bay & Cutler Bay | Vote NO on Amendment 1
Artist’s Statement

Let the Sunshine in-4Earlier this year, we moved into our new home in Palmetto Bay and installed solar panels. We wanted to do our part to protect the environment. Using clean energy helps save the planet by reducing the amount of “dirty” electricity we need to buy from utilities.

It also saves me money. Unlike fossil fuels, sunshine is free.

Most Floridians like clean energy. They would love to bring it to their homes.

Clean energy companies like it too. As do thoseemployed in the growing clean energy work force.

Not everyone likes the idea of clean energy, though.

The utilities don’t.

The utilities have spent $22 million to place a deceptive Constitutional Amendment on the ballot before Florida voters on November 8th, 2016. At first reading, Amendment 1 sounds as if it advances the cause of solar energy in the Sunshine State. Instead, it stifles competition and sets up mechanisms that disincentivize rooftop energy.  Utilities would rather have change on their own terms. They’re not accustomed to having competition and will do anything to stop potential competitors even if it means tricking you into voting against your own financial interests so they can increase their profits and increase the rate of our planet’s destruction.

I want to make my new neighbors aware about the truth behind this amendment. I want us to shine a light on this “wolf in sheep’s clothing” amendment so that they can make informed choices at the ballot box.

So, using old solar panels Cutler Bay Solar Solutions (my solar contractor) gave me, I created three “sun paintings:” One for my Palmetto Bay neighbors. The other for my neighbors to the south at Cutler Bay. And the other for my neighbors to the north in Pinecrest.

I want my new neighbors to see the sun art and see themselves reflected on the solar panels. I want them to see their connection to the sun.

Everything that lives on Planet Earth (including residents of Pinecrest, Palmetto Bay, and Cutler Bay) is threatened by humandisruptions to the perfect, but fragile balance created in synchrony with the sun.

Let’s live in balance with nature.

Let’s lower our carbon footprint.

Let’s harness the power ofthe sun.

Let’s follow its light.

Let’s use its energy to save the planet while growing our economy. Let’s make the right choices.

Vote No on Amendment 1 and let the sun shine in the ”Sunshine State!”

 

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CLIMA: (Tirandonos) pa’l Solar party

 

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Main Statement | Gallery | Press | Events | Livestream

 

FRIDAY DECEMBER 4
10am panel | Clean Coal video
7:00 pm party

 

 

Clima Pa l Solar Party 2

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FRIDAY DECEMBER 4
10am panel | 7:00 pm party

 

(Tirandonos) pa’l Solar (7 pm):
A party celebrating Solar Choice and Art Basel week, including live music, a Solar Petition Conga Line, and Solar fashion show featuring designs by Lea Nickless.  The event will feature Cortada’s:

SOLAR, a triptych on three solar panels in support of a ballot initiative proposed by Floridians for Solar Choice (see http://cortada.com/events/2015/SOLAR),

Painting a Brighter Future: a political/environmental performance art project, and

Sky high:  a participatory art project where participants will bring their FPL bill to make and fly paper airplanes — seeing if they can make them soar as high as their fossil fuel based utility rates.

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