“Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy…”

In 2005, I was asked to create the 2006 Florida Heritage Month poster.  I was charged with depicting the 5 flags that flew over my home state since Europeans made contact.  Every fourth-grade classroom was to receive the poster.  Instead of painting a Confederate flag, I chose to depict the demise of the Confederacy.

Below is the statement that I wrote then.  It was printed on the back side of every poster.

Xavier Cortada, “Five Flags / Florida,” 61.5″ x 96″, acrylic on canvas, 2005 “Five Flags/Florida” (Cortada’s “Five Flags / Florida” is In the collection of the Florida Department of State, commissioned for the 2006 Florida Heritage Month Commemorative Poster.)

 

“Five Flags/Florida” (2006)

Miami artist Xavier Cortada utilized the Florida coastline to depict its heritage: each wave represents a new wave of immigrants who set roots and established communities. The mangrove roots metaphorically depict our interconnectedness as people who share a rich and diverse cultural history.

The mangrove root on the left symbolizes Florida’s indigenous people. The two clusters of clouds above mark their first encounter with Europeans: Juan Ponce de Leon’s landing in 1513.

Each of the mangrove plants rising above the horizon represent the five flags that have since flown over the peninsula:

The first plant has two sets of leaves representing Spain’s two periods of control: 1513-1763 and 1784-1821. The leaves on the second plant resemble the fleur-de-lis on the French flag when it was flown over Florida during 1564-65. Great Britain’s reign over Florida, 1763-1784, is shown as a mangrove plant with sliced leaves as it divided the territory into East Florida and West Florida. As the war for American independence ended, all of the territory was returned to the Spanish.

In 1821, the United States bought Florida from Spain for $5 million. The fourth plant represents the American flag. Back then the American flag had 24 stars. That number grew by three when Florida became the 27th state in 1845. The plant is bifurcated because Florida split from the Union in 1861 to join the Confederacy. After the Confederacy was defeated, Florida returned to the Union at the end of the Civil War in 1865. Finally, the shriveled mangrove plant represents the demise of the Confederacy.

The mangrove root on the right honors those whose search for freedom (e.g.: Seminoles, slaves using the Underground Railroad, Holocaust survivors, Cuban exiles, and Haitian refugees among others) brought them to Florida’s shores.

The painting, “Five Flags/Florida,” was created by Mr. Cortada for Florida Heritage Month 2006.

 

Native Flags: Earth Day Reforestation in Miami-Dade County Schools


NATIVE FLAGS FB COVER

 

The Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science (Museum Volunteers for the Environment), Deering Estates and the FIU College of Architecture + The Artswill once again join their other community partners in implementing Native Flags, Xavier Cortada’s participatory eco-art project, in Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

For six-years, every single public school in Miami-Dade has received a green flag and native tree sapling for students to plant in their schools to commemorate Earth Day.

Cortada created this project to engage people globally to help slow the polar thaw: Participants plant a native tree next to a green flag at home and ask their neighbors to do the same.

On April 22nd, 2015,  special ceremonies will take place in two schools where Xavier Cortada will lead students in planting a tree and flag at their school.  Students will also be provided with saplings and flags for them to plant at home

nativeflags-dot-org-600px-72dpi-390x26110:00 am
Fulford Elemantary School 
16140 NE 18 Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Phone: 305-949-3425

See MIAMI HERALD article: Click here

2:00 pm
Miami Springs Middle School
150 South Royal Poinciana Blvd.
Miami Springs, Florida 33166
Phone: 305-888-6457


earthday 2015 announce
Resources:

Earth Day 2015 Announcement 4-1-2015
Deering Estates brochure
Native Flags PDF
Native Flags Palm Card