Group exhibit at the Weisman Art Museum

VANISHING ICE: ALPINE AND POLAR LANDSCAPES IN ART 1775-2012

Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota
January 27th, 2018 – May 13th, 2018

astridXavier Cortada, “astrid,” (2007). Permanent collection of the Whatcom Museum.

Xavier Cortada’s “Astrid” painting will be on exhibit at the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis, MN from January 27th through May 13th, 2018 as part of the “Vanishing Ice” exhibit curated by Barbara Matilsky — see http://www.vanishing-ice.org.  You can learn more about Cortada’s piece by reading the American Art essay by Alan Braddock and Renée Ater, Art in the Anthropocene — see http://cortada.com/press/2014/AmericanArt.

Cortada, recipient of a 2006-2007 National Science Foundation Antarctic Artists and Writers fellowship, traveled to Antarctica to implement a series of projects and installations. While there, the Miami artist created “ice paintings” using sea ice and sediment samples provided to him by scientists working in Antarctica.  The artist titled the works on paper by randomly selecting the names of geographic features from a map of the continent that inspired their creation.  To learn more about the series visit http://cortada.com/2007/ice-paintings.

astrid-s

Artist: Xavier Cortada
Title: “astrid”
Series: Ice Paintings: Antarctic Sea Ice series
Medium: Sea ice from the Antarctica’s Ross Sea, sediment from Antarctica’s Dry Valleys and mixed media on paper
Size: 12 inches x 9 inches
Year: 2007
Created onsite at McMurdo Station, Ross Island, Antarctica
Permanent collection of the Whatcom Museum.

Curatorial Narrative
Barbara Matilsky, Curator of Art

VANISHING ICE will introduce the rich artistic legacy of the planet’s frozen frontiers now threatened by climate change, a phenomena understood by the public primarily through news of devastating climactic events The exhibition offers another perspective by providing visitors an opportunity to experience the majesty of sublime landscapes that have inspired artists, writers, and naturalists for more than two hundred years. Interweaving science, history and art, and highlighting their historical interrelationships, the exhibition encourages audiences to value the preservation of alpine and polar environments for the well-being of both nature and culture. Through this exhibition, visitors will begin to appreciate how strongly embedded these regions are in our collective consciousness

Comprised of 70 works of art, Vanishing Ice will unfold thematically and chronologically, tracing the visual impact of glaciers, icebergs, and fields of ice – unique and often fantastic formations – on artists’ imaginations. International in scope, the exhibition features artists from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Russia, Switzerland, and the United States. It will examine the connections among generations of artists as they sought to understand and interpret the color, light, and structure of ice. Through their magical landscapes, visitors will vicariously experience the blue-green hues and extraordinary shapes of another world.

The confluence of art, science and public education is one of the major themes of the exhibition. In their quest to discover new pictorial motifs, the artist-as-explorer contributed to a greater understanding of the Earth. In the wake of the large number of voyages launched during the nineteenth century, images of alpine and polar landscapes helped popularize revolutionary scientific discoveries and theories in natural history, including the concept of an Ice Age concomitant with a vision of the planet’s ancient origins. Works of art by artists such as Jean-Antoine Linck (Swiss, 1766-1843) and Louis Lebreton (French, 1818–1866) appeared in scientific publications, expeditionary atlases, travelogues, popular magazines, and exhibitions. Today, these early landscapes continue to play a major role in science by helping climatologists measure the retreat of glaciers over the centuries.

A growing number of artists are once again journeying to alpine mountain ranges and the Poles, the most salient indicators of climate change, to document the effects of global warming. The fate of retreating glaciers have been presented by many photographers, including Gary Braasch, David Breashears, and Eirik Johnson who compare their views of the Rocky Mountains, Himalayas, and Andes with historical photographs, which will also be highlighted in the exhibition. Parallel to the nineteenth-century artists’ close relationship to natural history, their images appear in a wide range of venues, including books and exhibitions, helping to visualize the dramatic effects forecast by climate scientists.

Like their nineteenth and early-twentieth century counterparts, many artists are joining government-sponsored expeditions. The US National Science Foundation provides opportunities for artists as diverse as Eliot Porter and Camille Seaman to spend time in Antarctica as a way to increase awareness of polar research. Many artists, in the spirit of Frederic Edwin Church and William Bradford, have organized their own expeditions. Since 2007, artist David Buckland has been coordinating Arctic explorations composed of artists, scientists, musicians, and writers through the Cape Farewell Project, underscoring the expanded role of the artist-activist in publicizing climate change. Seventy artists have participated to date, including Paul D. Miller/DJ Spooky, whose work will also be featured in the exhibition along with video documentation of Cape Farewell’s inaugural expedition.

Vanishing Ice also examines the stylistic evolution of alpine and polar imagery over two centuries. Within this context, the exhibition will feature the wide array of materials, media, and techniques that artists have employed to vividly capture the frozen landscape. Initially limited to drawings, prints, paintings and later photography, artists now utilize video, sound, and site-specific sculpture to interpret these environments. Among the fifty internationally recognized historical and contemporary artists included are: Ansel Adams, Otto Olaf Becker, John Grade, Lauren Harris, Frank Hurley, Issac Julien, Rockwell Kent, Alexis Rockman, and Spencer Tunick.

Vanishing Ice will reveal the transformative power of art in shaping the public’s perception of these starkly beautiful environments. Beginning in the eighteenth century, writers and painters, such as Francois-August Biard (French, 1799–1882), and Frederic Edwin Church (American, 1826–1900) contributed to a new appreciation of alpine and polar landscapes, which were once regarded with fear and now experienced on a heightened, emotional level. This quality, described as the Sublime, intersected with spirituality and was one of the defining aspects of a culture in the throes of rapid industrialization. Polar ice and glaciated mountains became metaphors for both the control of nature and correspondingly lack of control, freedom, nationalism, and more recently climate change.

While showcasing the art, Vanishing Ice will present layers of information through illustrated text panels, graphs, maps and a multi-disciplinary time line featuring milestones in art, literature, science, exploration, and mountaineering, which will help visitors grasp the history of alpine and polar regions and their significance for Western culture. An introductory video, produced by the City of Bellingham’s TV10, will be aired in the gallery and broadcast on the cable channel. Quotes by artists, scientists, writers, and explorers will be strategically placed throughout the galleries to augment the key ideas and messages of the exhibition. The exhibition will feature interpretive graphics for understanding why the Arctic, Antarctica, and glaciers are so critical for maintaining a balanced, planetary ecosystem and suggest what individuals and communities can do to help mitigate global warming.

Additional components of the exhibition include: a 162-page catalogue, published by the University of Washington Press and a web site.

See http://www.whatcommuseum.org/galleries/upcoming/379-vanishing-ice

Regis House presents: Seahorses exhibit closing event

SeahorsesGallery | Opening InvitationPress release | Closing Invitation

Xavier Cortada, “Seahorse Society: South” 48″ x 36″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

Join us on

Thursday, May 11th, 2017
from 6 pm to 8 pm

for the official closing of

Seahorses

an exhibit by

Xavier Cortada

at

Pinecrest Gardens
Historic Entrance

11000 S Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs April 6 – May 11th, 2017th

 

Proceeds from sales will benefit Regis House.
As a law student, Cortada served as Executive Director of the adolescent drug and alcohol abuse center.

Founded in 1984, Regis House is a non-profit, 501(c)(3), charitable, community-based organization with the mission to improve lives for a healthy community through mental health, family support and substance abuse services.  Regis House, Inc. has served more than 70,000 families throughout Miami-Dade County since its inception.  Programs and services such as co-occurring psychiatric/mental health, substance abuse services, individual, group, and family counseling/therapy, school-based prevention programs, and public assistance programs are many of the programs, and services the agency has to offer.

Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens Earth Day Festival

 

Reclamation Projects to celebrate Earth Day 2017
by implementing Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada for a community event at Pinecrest Gardens this #EarthDay Weekend. We will be engaging visitors with Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!

 

Seahorse Society is a participatory art project by Xavier Cortada.  It promotes the educational and research efforts of www.projectseahorse.org

Join us at the Historic Entrance Gallery at Pinecrest Gardens on Earth Day Festival and learn about seahorses. Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will be there to discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida. Kids will be able draw seahorses and take a pledge to protect them.

The Seahorse Society activity at Pinecrest Gardens during the Earth Day Festival is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Reclamation Projects with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

 

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

Native Flags: 8th Annual Earth Day Celebration in every Miami-Dade public school

 

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Celebrates Earth Day 2017

At its meeting of February 15, 2017 the School Board approved Board Item H-4 proffered by School Board Member Perla Tabares Hantman, endorsing April 22, 2017 as Earth Day in Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

For the eighth year in a row, we are proud to again partner with local artist Xavier Cortada and local organizations on an Earth Day project through which all schools will be able to plant a native tree on campus, together with the symbolic posting of a land reclamation flag. Other partners in this native tree canopy enhancement project include FIU College of Arts, Sciences & Education│School of Environment, Arts and Society, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts, FIU Libraries│Digital Library of the Caribbean, Pinecrest Gardens, Frost Science, and the Deering Estate. In addition, students will be afforded the opportunity to interpret Earth Day by designing their own flag.

Starting on April 22nd photos of the tree planting and flag posting activities can be uploaded by the schools at: http://nativeflags.org/participate/upload/

For more information on this year’s Earth Day celebration or the land reclamation project go to www.NativeFlags.org or call 305-995-4646.

 

Celebrations are scheduled for Thursday April 20th, 2017 as follows:

 

8:30 am Ceremony –      Joella C. Good Elementary School

                                                6350 ZNW 188th Terrace

                                                Miami, Florida 33015

                                                Phone: 305-625-2008

10:30 am Ceremony –     Miami Sunset Senior High School

                                                13125 SW 72 Street

                                                Miami, Florida 33183

                                                Phone: 305-385-4255

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags: North Pole,” 2008.

 

 

 

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450” exhibit

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada
will be exhibiting his Native Flags project (www.nativeflags.org)
and his 2015 work, 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas.
at

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450”

An international symposium and curated exhibit focused on the intersection of science and art.
Exhibit & Special Event on Saturday, April 22, 2017
3:30 pm -10:00 pm; Free and open to the public
Exhibit on display from April 9 – June 26, 2017

 

HIT IT: Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it!,” video screen shot, 2015.
In acknowledgement of the support from the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

 

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it! | Burn it! | Eat it! | Freeze itBury it! video documentation of performance, 2015
Xavier Cortada

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas was created by Xavier Cortada during April-May 2015 during an artist residency at the Rising Seas Confab 2015, Rauschenberg Studio, Captiva, Florida. In this performance, Cortada comments with irony on the weak to non-existent actions being taken to address both the causes and the imminent realities of climate disruption in a State clearly at the epicenter of potential disaster—one which has been caused by inadequate action globally on soaring levels of greenhouse gases related to human activity.

Cortada has long been involved in art that intervenes in, and/or comments upon environmental problems. He has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Poleand direct-impact ecological art projects, in Florida, around the US, and internationally, (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland).

Xavier Cortada is Florida-educated and has lived in Miami since he was three. He is currently Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Science & Education and the College of Communication, Architecture + the Arts. (http://www.cortada.com)

 

ABOUT DEERING ESTATE:

The Deering Estate offers complimentary exhibit evenings, highlighting a variety of contemporary, historic, and visiting exhibitions inside the historic homes. Exhibit Evenings are free of charge and offer the public a chance to interact with artists and curators and to experience a variety of exhibit tours and talks. Exhibit Evenings are held from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, unless otherwise noted. Exhibit on view daily, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Free with Estate Admission.

Project Seahorse presents “Seahorses” exhibit, launches initiative

SeahorsesGallery | Opening Invitation | Press release | Closing Invitation

Join us for the official opening of
Xavier Cortada’s “Seahorses” art exhibit on

Thursday, April 6th, 2017
from 6 pm to 8 pm 

as we launch Project Seahorse‘s latest initiative

Seahorses: Magical Creatures in your Backyard

As space is limited, please RSVP to this opening event here: https://seahorses.eventbrite.ca

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Seahorse Society: East” 48″ x 36″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

Seahorses

an exhibit by

Xavier Cortada

at

Pinecrest Gardens
Historic Entrance

11000 S Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs April 6 – May 12th, 2017th


 

 


Project Seahorse is a marine conservation group dedicated to securing a world where marine ecosystems are healthy and well-managed.  Their “Seahorses: Magical Creatures in Our Backyard” initiative aims to build awareness about seahorses and other syngnathids in Biscayne National Park and inspire residents of Miami-Dade County to take action to protect the park and their oceans.  Charismatic symbols of the seagrasses, mangroves, reefs and estuaries they call home, seahorses are flagship species for a wide range of marine conservation issues in Biscayne National Park.” Learn more at http://www.projectseahorse.org.

“This campaign made possible through the generous support of the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation. The Herbert W. Hoover Foundation takes a leadership role in funding unique opportunities that provide solutions to issues related to the community, education, and the environment.”

 

Panel Discussion | BAKING HISTORY: BAC’s LEGACY AND FUTURE

Panel Discussion
BAKING HISTORY: BAC’s LEGACY AND FUTURE

Thirty Years after the Ribbon Cutting

On February 1, 1987 a group of artists and art enthusiasts cut the ribbon to mark a new era for American Bakeries Company Art Deco era facility as it was officially converted from industrial bakery to art complex. As a place to work and exhibit for thousands of local, national and international artists over the last three decades, this place has played a very important role in many creatives’ careers and stands tall as a pioneer for the arts in Wynwood.

As we commemorate the Bakehouse’s 30th anniversary, current alongside former artists and directors will assemble on this panel to provide personal and historical highlights including unique experiences, memories and the inevitable challenges of “toughing it out” as a nonprofit, day after day. A particular focus will be placed BAC’s engagement with the community and with public art since its inception.

 

Tuesday, March 21, 2017  6-8pm 

Audrey Love Gallery

Bakehouse Art Complex

561 NW 32nd St.

Miami, FL 33127

 

 

Panelists:

Vivian Rodriguez, Founding Executive Director of the Bakehouse Art Complex

Bibi Baloyra, Executive Director of the Bakehouse Art Complex

Carola Bravo (Former BAC artist)

Maria Martinez Cañas (Former BAC artist)

Gary Moore (Former BAC artist)

Robert McKnight (Former BAC artist)

Xavier Cortada (Former BAC artist)

Aurora Molina (Current BAC artist)

Troy Simmons (Current BAC artist)

 Stephanie Jaffe-Werner (Current BAC artist)

Moderator: 

Yuneikys Villalonga, Associate Director of Exhibitions and Education

 

 

 

Climate Wrongs and Human Rights (University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium)

2017 Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium, Climate Wrongs and Human Rights, has been announced. Scholarship from this annual event will be featured in the symposium issue to be published in the Volume 72, Winter Edition.

Student / General Public Registration – here

CLE Registration (8 credits available) – here

Friday, February 10, 2017

Saturday, February 11, 2017

University of Miami Storer Auditorium

5250 University Drive, Coral Gables, Florida 33146


About the Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review’s Symposium is an annual event that leads to the publication of an issue. This year’s Symposium, entitled “Climate Wrongs and Human Rights” will explore the human rights implications of climate change. Panelists will examine this topic through a variety of subjects, including democracy, federalism, immigration, and philosophy. The Symposium will also feature art by Miami Arist and UM Law Alum, Xavier Cortada.

Keynote Speaker 
Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe
Featured Artist 
Cortada will provide opening remarks on Saturday, February 11 and invite the audience to participate in his performative art project, titled “Do Not Open.” 

Panel I—Ground Zero: Miami

What does climate change mean for the City of Miami? This panel will provide a comparative analysis of adaptation measures amongst different parts of the city and will examine the disparate impact of climate change in Miami. This panel will explore if and how law and policy is mitigating the pressing effects of climate change in South Florida.

Panelists:

Abigail CorbettShareholder, Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A. 
Benjamin KirtmanProfessor, University of Miami Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science 
Elizabeth WheatonEnvironment and Sustainability Director, City of Miami Beach

Moderator: Catherine KaimanLecturer in Law, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel II—Climate Democracy 

Can democracy adequately address climate change and its human rights implications? This panel will explore how political and legal institutions must adapt to the ongoing crisis of climate change to effectuate meaningful solutions.

Panelists: 

Rebecca BratspiesProfessor of Law, The City University of New York School of Law
Dale JamiesonProfessor, New York University School of Law 
Alice KaswanProfessor, University of San Francisco School of Law 

Moderator: Felix MormannAssociate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law

Panel III—Climate Refugees 

Is the displacement of climate refugees a humanitarian concern? This panel will discuss the link between climate change and human migration. It will explore if and how immigration law and policy should evolve to address climate refugees.

Panelists: 

Sumudu AtapattuSenior Lecturer, University of Wisconsin Law School 
Michael GerrardProfessor, Columbia Law School 
Katrina WymanProfessor of Law, New York University School of Law 

Moderator: Roxana BaconVisiting Professor, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel IV—Climate Philosophy 

Is the right to a clean environment a human right? Do we have a duty to the next generation? We invite the audience to consider these questions as the panelists focus on the moral obligations individuals have in addressing climate change and in ameliorating the human rights implications of climate change. This panel will inquire as to the gaps in urgency between policy makers and scientists.

Panelists: 

Stephen GardinerProfessor, University of Washington 
Naomi OreskesProfessor, Harvard University 
Jacqueline PattersonDirector, Environmental and Climate Justice Program, NAACP

Moderator: James Nickel, Professor, University of Miami School of Law

 


A printable version of the tentative schedule is forthcoming. However, the tentative schedule can be found listed below:

Friday, February 10, 2017

1:00 p.m. – 1: 30 p.m.        Registration

1:30 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.         Welcome

1:35 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.         Introduction of Keynote

1:50 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.           Keynote: Chief Albert Naquin, Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean    Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe

2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.            Break

2:50 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.             Panel I – Ground Zero: Miami

4:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.             Break

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.              Panel II- Climate Democracy

Saturday, February 11, 2017

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.              Registration

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.              Welcome

9:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.            Panel III—Climate Refugees

11:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.          Break

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.            Panel IV – Climate Philosophy

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.              Closing

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy presents “DO NOT OPEN” performance

 

Contact: Jennifer Rennicks, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Alissa@cleanenergy.org, 954-734-3773

 

ADVISORY: Miami Community Leaders, Elected Officials, and Artist, Join in Interactive Art Installation

to Highlight Sea Level Rise and Uncertain Future of South Florida

Event emphasizes climate action uncertainty as President-Elect Trump is inaugurated

 

Miami, Fla. – One day before the inauguration of climate change denier President-Elect Trump, Miami-based and globally featured artist Xavier Cortada will host a live performance as a portion of his ongoing research driven art, CLIMA 2016. The interactive exhibit “Do Not Open” invites participants to imagine the future of South Florida, its communities, and the effects of sea level rise, writing letters to future Floridians placed in a time capsule. 

When: January 19th at 7:00 PM

Where: Cortada Art Studio Gallery, 4664 SW 75th Avenue, Miami, FL 33155

Who:

  • Xavier Cortada
  • Elected Officials
  • Community Leaders
  • South Florida Residents

What: The event, through art, will draw attention to the challenge of climate change impacts to South Florida and the need for more action now. This is an especially critical and timely message as the event is being held only one day before the inauguration of a new president who vocally denies climate change and its effects already being felt by communities throughout the world. The Do Not Open art installation is a time capsule to capture written messages/letters that will be added to the exhibit by Xavier Cortada. The performance also coincides with the full gallery opening featuring a series of ceramic and tile works.

###

Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.

DO NOT OPEN:  Participant Instructions | Artist’s Poem

City of Sweetwater submerged beneath a 6 foot sea level rise.

Submerged: City of Sweetwater beneath a 6-foot rise in sea level (using the eyesontherise app).

 

  • Walk up to the “Do Not Open” wall in the exhibit.
  • Close your eyes: Imagine your city in the future. Imagine how rising seas will impact it and those who will live here then.
  • Think about what you would like them to know. Think about what you believe someone living in 2041, 2066, 2116 or 2216 will need to hear from someone living in 2016.
  • Unclip a blank piece of paper and envelope from the wall and use a pencil to write it all down:  Tell them who you are. Tell them why you are writing to them. Sign it. Date it.
  • Fold the letter in two, kiss it, place it in the envelope and seal it.
  • On the outside of the envelope write only one of these four phrases:

“DO NOT OPEN: 25 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 50 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 100 years”
or
“DO NOT OPEN: 200 years”

  • Clip the sealed envelope to the “Do Not Open” wall with the words facing out.
  • Stare at your envelope for 25 seconds, 50 seconds, 100 seconds, or 200 seconds.
  • Think of how your words will be received in the future.
  • Walk away

Earlier Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

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