CLIMA: An annual exhibit addressing Global Climate Change and Sea Level Rise


CLIMA Home | Main 2017Main 2016 | Main 2015

 

You are cordially invited to the opening of

CLIMA

an exhibit addressing Global Climate Change and Sea Level Rise
on Thursday, March 29th, 2018  from 6 pm to 9 pm.

at

The Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

 

CLIMA features the work of artists

John Bailly

Xavier Cortada

Michael Gray 

and

Gretchen Scharnagl

plus interactive works developed by

FIU School of Communication + Journalism and Code for Miami

 

 

Gretchen Scharnagl, “Ate Grapefruit,” 2015

 

 

 

 

Join us on Thursday, March 29th 2017 at 6pm at the Hibiscus Gallery in Pinecrest Gardens for the opening of CLIMA, an exhibit addressing Global Climate Change and Sea Level Rise. This third-annual show features the work of artists John Bailly, Xavier Cortada, Michael Gray, and Gretchen Scharnagl. The exhibit will also feature interactive works developed by the FIU School of Communication + Journalism and Code for Miami to address sea level rise- including “Will it Flood?,” a new flood prediction app: type in your address! See when the high tides will affect your neighborhood!

The CLIMA exhibit is presented in partnership with Florida International University College of Arts & Sciences School of Environment, Society and the Arts (SEAS), the FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA), the FIU Honors College (Honors) and the FIU Sea Level Solutions Center (SLSC).



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CLIMA Home | Main 2017Main 2016 | Main 2015

CLIMA 2016 featured Cortada’s “DO NOT OPEN”

Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.


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CLIMA Home | Main 2017Main 2016 | Main 2015

CLIMA 2015 featured Cortada’s “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas”

Xavier Cortada, "Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: FREEZE IT!," video sreen shot, 2015. In acknowledgement of the support of the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: FREEZE IT!,” video screen shot, 2015. In acknowledgment of the support of the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

 

“Water Paintings,” a solo exhibition of works created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

“Water Paintings”

a solo exhibition of works
created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
by


Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from March 26th through April 29th, 2018

WATER PAINTINGS

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Xavier Cortada works with Hydrologist Mark Green to create “Water Paintings” at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

 

Water Paintings allowed me to give water at Hubbard Brook’s nine watersheds a voice.  In the work, I made water the protagonist.  In June 2016, I placed nine pencil drawings and nine pieces of watercolor paper inside nylon mesh.  I then tied the mesh bags to a rope at each of the nine weirs at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and left them there for a period of 16 weeks in 2016.  The water flowing through the mesh stained the paper inside.  Water samples and water data were collected by scientists over the same 16-week period from the same nine weirs.  The final work included water samples, data, even the residue in filters.  I wanted audiences to see the water, what the water did, and what it painted as it flowed and transported materials down the stream.”

Xavier Cortada

 

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Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

 

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Small first-order watersheds can show us how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Chemical concentrations combined with stream flow provides data on stream-water element flux for each watershed.

Water samples and data collected by scientists over a 16-week period from all nine watersheds hang on the walls CLIMA.

Nine sets of “Water Paintings” hang from the ceiling. Cortada created each using the same water scientists study. He placed watercolor paper in mesh and tied it to a rope in each of the nine weirs. The works depict 4 months of streamflow.

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.
History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

 

 

 

About the artist:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

 

Film Screening: Battleground Everglades | Dangerous Seas

 

 

Please join us for the special screening of “Dangerous Seas” on Wednesday, January 24th at 7PM at the Deering Estate in Miami.  The episode of DANGEROUS SEAS showcases Florida artist Xavier Cortada using his own creativity to inspire environmental restoration.

This event is open to the public and is RSVP only.  Click here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/premiere-battleground-everglades-at-the-deering-estate-tickets-41877591002?aff=efbeventtix  (EVENT CLOSED/Sold out)

 

DESCRIPTION

As part of the Speaking Sustainably Film Series, South Florida PBS (WPBT2 – WXEL) and the Deering Estate invite you to a complimentary reception and screening of the Battleground Everglades, Dangerous Seas, on January 24th at 7pm at the Deering Estate Visitor Center Theatre. Reception begins at 7pm with light snacks and beverages. The screening will begin at 7:30pm. Following the screening guests can participate in a Q&A with featured experts and the production crew. Event is free and open to the public.

BATTLEGROUND EVERGLADES explores the struggle to save one of the world’s most revered wetlands: Florida’s Everglades. Devastated by a century of drainage and development, the entire Everglades watershed is suffering from man-made pollution, habitat destruction and species decline.

Hosted by Charles Kropke, author and well-known Everglades expert, the 6-part series showcases dramatic challenges and innovative solutions to restore this World Heritage Site. As more and more countries battle sea level rise, invasive species, algae outbreaks and other environmental issues, the Everglades is poised to become a beacon of learning and hope.

“DANGEROUS SEAS” EPISODE:

South Florida is at the epicenter of a world-wide threat from sea level rise. DANGEROUS SEAS examines how Florida’s porous Biscayne aquifer, the source of South Florida’s drinking water, is endangered by rising oceans and other contaminates.

The program also journeys to a remote Florida Bay mud flat, to discover how sea level rise contributes to dwindling bird nesting populations. In Everglades National Park, audiences can watch scientists studying how sea level rise is affecting critical peat soil, a building block for Florida’s storm-vulnerable coasts. DANGEROUS SEAS also showcases a well-known Florida artist using his own creativity to inspire environmental restoration.

The series will begin airing on both South Florida PBS stations in February 2018, See below airdate schedule! 

WPBT :

101 – Algea  Explosion – Wednesday, February 7th,  7:30 PM

102 – War on Invasive Species – Wednesday, February 14, 7:30 PM

103 – The Battle Over Big Water – Wednesday, February 21, 7:30 PM

104 – Dangerous Seas – Wednesday, February 28, 7:30 PM

105 – Survival at Stake – Wednesday, March 7, 7:30 PM

106 – Glades Warriors – Wednesday, March 14, 7:30 PM

 

WXEL :

101 – Algea  Explosion – Thursday, February 8th, 8 PM

102 – War on Invasive Species – Thursday, February 25,  8 PM

103 – The Battle Over Big Water – Thursday, February 22, 8 PM

104 – Dangerous Seas – Thursday, March 1, 8 PM

105 – Survival at Stake – Thursday, March 8, 8 PM

106 – Glades Warriors – Thursday, March 15, 8 PM

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation” during Power of Arts Museum at Sweetwater

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation”

 

 

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007

Longitudinal Installation,” created by Cortada a decade ago as part of his NSF Antarctic Artists and Writers Program residency in Antarctica, will be performed by Sweetwater Elementary School students on May 24th at 7 pm.  The performance and activity is co-presented by the Reclamation Projects with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

Participate by following these steps:

1. Find a group of 24 people to perform the Longitudinal Installation ritual with and engage in the performance.
Click here to download instructions.

2. Document the performance with photos and video.

3. Upload photo on www.facebook.com/longitudinalinstallation

4.  Add the “25th quote.”

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007 (Listen: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.xaviercortada.com/resource/resmgr/longitudinal_installation_no.mp3)

24 Global Voices

longitude11x17_graphicThese quotes taken from newspapers across 24 time zones that talking about the impact of climate change on that individual’s life. After Xavier Cortada completed the Longitudinal Installation at the South Pole, he walked to the 0 degree longitude, the prime meridian, and walked clockwise around the pole. He stopped at each shoe to recite each of the following quotes:

 

0°, Spain:
“There may be a move of wineries into the Pyrenees in the future.”
— Xavier Sort, technical director of Miguel Torres Wineries.

15° E, Switzerland:
“Losses to insurers from environmental events have risen exponentially over the past 30 years, and are expected to rise even more rapidly still.”
— Pamela Heck, Insurance Industry Expert.

30° E, Zimbabwe:
“We used to be able to grow everything we want but that has all changed.”
— Matsapi Nyathi, Grandmother.

45° E, Turkey:
“We are helpless. We’re trying to rescue trapped people while also trying to evacuate flood waters that have inundated hundreds of houses.”
— Muharrem Ergul, Mayor, Beykoz district of Istanbul.

60° E, Iran:
“More than 90 percent of our wetlands have completely dried up.”
— Alamdar Alamdari, environmental researcher, Fars Province.

75° E, Maldives:
“In the worst case scenario, we’ll have to move.”
— Foreign Ministry spokesman Ahmed Shaheed.

90° E, Tibet, China:
“The Sherpas of Khumbu may not know everything, but they are suffering the consequences of the people’s greed. We mountain people should be careful and take precautions. If we don’t save Khumbu today our fresh water will dry up and the problem will be impossible to solve in the future.”
— Ngawang Tenzing Jangpo, the Abbot of Tengboche monastery.

105° E, Borneo, Indonesia:
“There’s been no rain, it’s horrible. The governor’s office has instructed schools and offices to close until further notice.”
— Hidayat, government official.

120° E, Philippines:
“The disaster covered almost every corner of this province – rampaging floods, falling trees, damaged houses. It happened very rapidly and many people did not expect this because they haven’t experienced mud flows in those areas before.”
— Fernando Gonzalez, governor of Albay province.

135° E, Japan:
“It’s no exaggeration to say that Japan faces a critical situation when describing the rapid decline of marine supply in its domestic waters that is linked to seaweed loss. Tengusa (seaweed) provides food for marine species.”
— Tomohiro Takase, head of the fisheries department at the Hachijojima municipality.

150° E, Great Barrier Reef, Australia:
“In 20 years’ time, bleaching is highly likely to be annual and that will cause shallow-water corals to be in decline. We need to start working out how we can help people who rely on it for their income. It’s really quite a stunning fact.”
— Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, director of the Centre for Marine Studies at the University of Queensland.

165° E, Micronesia:
“We have nowhere to go.”
— Ben Namakin, Environmental Educator.

180°, Tuvalu: “Tuvalu is the first victim of global warming.”
— Koloa Talake, former prime minister.

165° W , Niue: “Yesterday morning we woke up to a scene of so much devastation, it was just unbelievable. Cyclone Heta was just so fast, furious and ruthless.”
— Cecelia Talagi, Government Secretary.

150° W, Alaska, USA:
“We are at a crossroads. . . Is it practical to stand and fight our Mother Ocean? Or do we surrender and move?”
— Shishmaref Mayor Edith Vorderstrasse.

135° W, Yukon, Canada:
“The weather is really unpredictable and the ice freezes much later and breaks up earlier. There are more incidents of hunters falling through the ice.”
— Kik Shappa, Hunter, Griese Fiord, Canada.

120° W Nunavut, Canada:
“Our cultural heritage is at stake here. We are an adaptable people. We have over the millennium been able to adapt to incredible circumstances. But I think adaptability has its limits. If the ice is not forming, how else does one adapt to seasons that are not as they used to be when the whole environment is changing underneath our feet, literally?”
— Sheila Watt-Cloutier, president of the circumpolar conference.

105° W, Colorado, USA:
“In Colorado, climate change means less snow, less water, more wildfires, less biodiversity and less economic opportunity, as there is less water available for development.”
— Stephen Saunders, president, Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.

90° W, Nicaragua:
“I closed my eyes and prayed to God.”
— Mariana González, Hurricane Mitch survivor.

75° W, Peru:
“I tell my wife the day that mountain loses its snow, we will have to move out of the valley.”
— Jose Ignacio Lambarri, farmer, Urubamba Valley.

60° W, Argentina:
“The flooding has forced us to redesign routes. We thought it would be for a short period of time, but it has been almost six years.”
— Carlos Avellaneda, manager of a trucking company.

45° W, Brazil:
“I am very frightened. One thing goes wrong, and the entire system follows.”
— Jair Souto, Mayor of Manaquiri.

30° W, Greenland:
“They tell us that we must not eat mattak [whale blubber], but this is all we know. Eating Inughuit food makes us who we are, and anyway we have nothing else to eat!”
— Tekummeq, Town of Qaanaaq.

15° W, Maurtitania:
“We are only eating one meal a day. When there is not enough food, it is the young and the old that get fed first.”
— Fatimitu Mint Eletou, Bouchamo.


Regis House presents: Seahorses exhibit closing event

SeahorsesGallery | Opening InvitationPress release | Closing Invitation

Xavier Cortada, “Seahorse Society: South” 48″ x 36″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

Join us on

Thursday, May 11th, 2017
from 6 pm to 8 pm

for the official closing of

Seahorses

an exhibit by

Xavier Cortada

at

Pinecrest Gardens
Historic Entrance

11000 S Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs April 6 – May 11th, 2017th

 

Proceeds from sales will benefit Regis House.
As a law student, Cortada served as Executive Director of the adolescent drug and alcohol abuse center.

Founded in 1984, Regis House is a non-profit, 501(c)(3), charitable, community-based organization with the mission to improve lives for a healthy community through mental health, family support and substance abuse services.  Regis House, Inc. has served more than 70,000 families throughout Miami-Dade County since its inception.  Programs and services such as co-occurring psychiatric/mental health, substance abuse services, individual, group, and family counseling/therapy, school-based prevention programs, and public assistance programs are many of the programs, and services the agency has to offer.

Seahorse Society at Sweetwater Elementary School

 

Sweetwater Elementary students to join the Seahorse Society 

Xavier Cortada, “Hippocampus,” 48″ x 24″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada to present an educational event at Sweetwater Elementary school on May 2nd, 2017. We will be teaching students about Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!  Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida and discuss the educational and research efforts conducted by her international group (see www.projectseahorse.org).  Students will also participate in a collaborative art project culminating in an installation that captures their pledge to protect them.  At the end of the event, students will be inducted into the Seahorse Society.  The performance and activity is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

 

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens Earth Day Festival

 

Reclamation Projects to celebrate Earth Day 2017
by implementing Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada for a community event at Pinecrest Gardens this #EarthDay Weekend. We will be engaging visitors with Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!

 

Seahorse Society is a participatory art project by Xavier Cortada.  It promotes the educational and research efforts of www.projectseahorse.org

Join us at the Historic Entrance Gallery at Pinecrest Gardens on Earth Day Festival and learn about seahorses. Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will be there to discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida. Kids will be able draw seahorses and take a pledge to protect them.

The Seahorse Society activity at Pinecrest Gardens during the Earth Day Festival is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

Sweetwater Elementary to grow FLOR500 wildflowers in every student’s home

 

FLOR500 | Sweetwater
Miami artist Xavier Cortada will lead Sweetwater Elementary School students in creating a participatory eco-art project in support of the pollinators.  Inspired by his FLOR500 project (www.flor500.com), kids at the school will plant wildflower seeds to grow in their classroom.  Each student will have a cup with their name on it.  Each student will also create a hand-painted flag celebrating Earth Day.  Once sprouted, the student will take the wildflower plants home and plant them alongside their flags.  Planting the flag, they will become reverse conquistadores, returning a patch of land back to nature.

The first garden (see photo above) featured Coreopsis lanceolata, the official state wildflower. It was planted in front of the Museum of Florida History in Tallahassee, FL on March 22, 2012 and dedicated to Florida’s indigenous people.

 

“Each of us has a role in helping shape Florida’s natural history,” said Cortada.  “We can help reclaim nature, one yard at a time, by planting wildflower gardens to support our pollinators.”  Cortada hopes his art piece will help educate individuals about the importance of Florida’s ecosystems and encourage better environmental stewardship.  This FLOR500 | Sweetwater participatory eco-art project at Sweetwater Elementary School is presented by FIU Frost Art Museum, FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Sciences & Education, the FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts, and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

 FLOR500 is a participatory art, nature, and history project created by Miami artist Xavier Cortada to commemorate Florida’s quincentennial in 2013. The project marks the importance of the moment when the history of our state changed forever and gives us a glimpse of what its landscape was like 500 years ago.
500 flowers
A team of scientists selected the 500 native flowers-  the same ones that grew in our state when Juan Ponce de Leon landed in 1513 and named it “La Florida”–from “flor,” the Spanish word for flower.
500 artists
Five hundred Floridians were then invited to depict 500 native wildflowers. The artwork, along with information about each flower, will be posted on the project website (www.FLOR500.com).500 gardens
A team of historians selected individuals who helped shape Florida history.  Florida schools and libraries (across the 67 counties and 8 regions) are encouraged to plant 500 wildflower gardens, dedicating them to one of 500 important Floridians selected by a team of historians.  These 500 new native habitats will help support Florida’s biodiversity.

Wildflowers, with help of their pollinators, help make Earth verdant:  Plant life sustains all animals (including humans) and balance atmospheric gases (that accelerate global climate change). Wildflowers would naturally continue to blanket our planet were it not for the displacement caused by the concrete we’ve poured ‐‐ and the parcels we’ve platted ‐‐ to build our homes and grow our society. Help reverse the trend:  Show us your wild side. Plant wildflowers in your yard.”
— Xavier Cortada

About the Artist: 

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Sciences & Education  and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art efforts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

Fore more info visit http://www.cortada.com

Native Flags: 8th Annual Earth Day Celebration in every Miami-Dade public school

 

On April 20th, 2017, MDCPS School Board Chair Larry Feldman helps Miami Sunset Senior High School students plant a live oak on their campus.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Celebrates Earth Day 2017

At its meeting of February 15, 2017 the School Board approved Board Item H-4 proffered by School Board Member Perla Tabares Hantman, endorsing April 22, 2017 as Earth Day in Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

For the eighth year in a row, we are proud to again partner with local artist Xavier Cortada and local organizations on an Earth Day project through which all schools will be able to plant a native tree on campus, together with the symbolic posting of a land reclamation flag. Other partners in this native tree canopy enhancement project include FIU College of Arts, Sciences & Education│School of Environment, Arts and Society, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts, FIU Libraries│Digital Library of the Caribbean, Pinecrest Gardens, Frost Science, and the Deering Estate. In addition, students will be afforded the opportunity to interpret Earth Day by designing their own flag.

Starting on April 22nd photos of the tree planting and flag posting activities can be uploaded by the schools at: http://nativeflags.org/participate/upload/

For more information on this year’s Earth Day celebration or the land reclamation project go to www.NativeFlags.org or call 305-995-4646.

 

Celebrations are scheduled for Thursday April 20th, 2017 as follows:

 

8:30 am Ceremony –      Joella C. Good Elementary School

                                                6350 ZNW 188th Terrace

                                                Miami, Florida 33015

                                                Phone: 305-625-2008

10:30 am Ceremony –     Miami Sunset Senior High School

                                                13125 SW 72 Street

                                                Miami, Florida 33183

                                                Phone: 305-385-4255

 

 

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags: North Pole,” 2008.

 

 

 

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450” exhibit

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada
will be exhibiting his Native Flags project (www.nativeflags.org)
and his 2015 work, 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas.
at

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450”

An international symposium and curated exhibit focused on the intersection of science and art.
Exhibit & Special Event on Saturday, April 22, 2017
3:30 pm -10:00 pm; Free and open to the public
Exhibit on display from April 9 – June 26, 2017

 

HIT IT: Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it!,” video screen shot, 2015.
In acknowledgement of the support from the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

 

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it! | Burn it! | Eat it! | Freeze itBury it! video documentation of performance, 2015
Xavier Cortada

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas was created by Xavier Cortada during April-May 2015 during an artist residency at the Rising Seas Confab 2015, Rauschenberg Studio, Captiva, Florida. In this performance, Cortada comments with irony on the weak to non-existent actions being taken to address both the causes and the imminent realities of climate disruption in a State clearly at the epicenter of potential disaster—one which has been caused by inadequate action globally on soaring levels of greenhouse gases related to human activity.

Cortada has long been involved in art that intervenes in, and/or comments upon environmental problems. He has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Poleand direct-impact ecological art projects, in Florida, around the US, and internationally, (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland).

Xavier Cortada is Florida-educated and has lived in Miami since he was three. He is currently Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Science & Education and the College of Communication, Architecture + the Arts. (http://www.cortada.com)

 

ABOUT DEERING ESTATE:

The Deering Estate offers complimentary exhibit evenings, highlighting a variety of contemporary, historic, and visiting exhibitions inside the historic homes. Exhibit Evenings are free of charge and offer the public a chance to interact with artists and curators and to experience a variety of exhibit tours and talks. Exhibit Evenings are held from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, unless otherwise noted. Exhibit on view daily, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Free with Estate Admission.