LTER All Scientists’ Meeting | Next Generation Synthesis: Successes and Strategies

LTER All Scientists’ Meeting | Next Generation Synthesis: Successes and Strategies

Workshop: Integration of the Environmental Sciences, Arts, and Humanities Across the LTER Network

 

Xavier Cortada, Diatom, archival ink on aluminum, 36in x 18in, 2014 (edition 1 of 5).

 

The integration of environmental science, arts, and humanities (eSAH) is flourishing across the LTER network, where it is being applied to enhance outreach/education activities as well as fundamental inquiry with the aspirational goal of helping society overcome the social-ecological grand challenges of today.

During this workshop organized by Bonanza Creek LTER’s Dr. Mary Beth Leigh ( University of Alaska Fairbanks), scientists will:

a) share examples of varying eSAH activities from across the LTER network through brief presentations from artists, scientists, and organizers,

b) report on research assessing the impacts of eSAH activities on audiences and their value to LTER,

c) analyze the range and extent of interdisciplinary integration currently being achieved through different programmatic models, and

d) develop an action plan for organizing, communicating, and expanding the growing network of LTER eSAH programs.

Xavier Cortada will serve as special guest artist/speaker to present on his work as artist in residence at the following LTER sites:

  • Florida Coastal Everglades LTER (Florida)
  • H J Andrews LTER (Oregon)
  • Hubbard Brook LTER (New Hampshire)

 

Welcoming the Seasons: Longitudinal Installation performance

Welcoming the 2018 Seasons…

Xavier Cortada. “Longitudinal Installation,” South Pole (2007) and North Pole (2008).

 

Please join us for the performance of the Longitudinal Installation as we greet each new season

Fall Equinox

LONGITUDINAL INSTALLATION
Xavier Cortada

Sunday, September  23, 2018 at 10:30am

at

Pinecrest Gardens
11000 SW 57th Avenue
Pinecrest, FL 33156

The participatory art piece captures voices from 24 individual across the globe who have been impacted by Climate Change.

The event is free and open to the public.
For more info call 305-669-6990 or visit

Learn more at www.longitudinalinstallation.org

 

 

Longitudinal Installation

The Longitudinal Installation at In the Garden Pinecrest Gardens: Cortada created the Longitudinal Installation in the South Pole in 2007 and in the North Pole in 2008. During both visits, Cortada placed 24 shoes in a circle, each aligned across 24 longitudes. He stopped in front of each of his longitudinal shoe markers and read a quote aloud that revealed a person’s experience with climate change from that part of the world. His artistic ritual illustrated how everyone in the world has been profoundly impacted by climate change.

In the Garden:
The South Pole’s Longitudinal Installation has been replicated as a ceramic sculpture on permanent exhibit at Pinecrest Gardens. This participatory art installation invites visitors to recite the 24 quotes, as Cortada did at both ends of the world.

To perform the ritual, stand behind the show marked with zero degrees and face the red and white pole as you read the first quote. (You can find the quotes online at www.longitudinalinstallation.org.) Then, move clockwise, stopping at each marked shoe to read its respective quote. Upon completion, stand just to the right of the 75 degree West shoe (if you live in Florida) and recite a 25th quote: Your own quote!

25th quote: How has climate change impacted your environment?
If you perform the ritual, we invite you to document the performance with photos and video, and upload it to www.longitudinalinstallation.org

 

Greeting each new season

Please join us In the Garden at Pinecrest Gardens for the performance of the Longitudinal Installation as we greet each new season:

Aside from his ongoing Florida is Nature project and the Longitudinal Installation, Pinecrest Gardens artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada is creating other permanent participatory art projects and ritualistic installations onsite at Pinecrest Gardens, South Florida’s Cultural Arts Park.  

To schedule an environmental art-based field trip for your classroom or co-op, please contact Lacey Bray, educational programs coordinator, at lbray@pinecrest-fl.gov.  Pinecrest Gardens is located at 11000 SW 57th Avenue, Pinecrest, FL.

Creative Pinellas presents “As the Arctic Melts …,” an artist’s talk by Xavier Cortada

90N:     Main | Event | Gallery | Press
Galleries:     Arctic Ice Paintings | Native Flags | Endangered World | Longitudinal Installation | North Pole Dinner Party

 

 

 

Creative Pinellas 
presents

As the Arctic Melts …

an artist’s talk by
Xavier Cortada

on
Thursday, July 19th, 2018
7:00 – 8:30 pm

at
Pinewood Cultural Center Auditorium
12211 Walsingham Road
Largo, FL 33778

 

 

 

The lecture is presented in conjunction with the presentation of the artist’s 
90N: North Pole Installations exhibition across the way at

Gallery Creative Pinellas
12211 Walsingham Road
Largo, FL 33778

 

Exhibition runs June 29, 2018 through September 2, 2018 

 

 

Ten years ago, Cortada’s ice breaker easily pushed through the then-thinning polar ice, surprising the crew at its early arrival in the North Pole. Arctic warming has since continued melting sea ice at frightening speed:   “Within two decades” stated the artist, “I will be able to repeat the journey on a sailboat, because scientists tell us the Arctic Ocean will be ice-free during summer. Global Climate Change will not just melt the Arctic, it will irrevocably change the world below.”

“I bring this exhibition to the people of Florida to draw the alarming connection between the Arctic and our peninsula,” said Cortada. “Melting ice will have catastrophic effects across our state and weaken the Gulf Stream. Arctic warming will lead to sea level rise, more coastal flooding, prolonged heatwaves, relentless rain, stalled tropical storms, extreme weather and more intense fire seasons.”

 

About the Artist

Xavier Cortada created art installations at the North Pole and South Pole to address environmental concerns at every point in between. He’s been commissioned to create art for CERN, the White House, the World Bank, Miami City Hall, Miami-Dade County Hall, Florida Botanical Gardens, Port Everglades, Florida’s Turnpike, the Museum of Florida History, the Frost Science Museum and Miami-Dade Children’s Courthouse. Locally, his work is in the permanent collection of the Frost Art Museum, PAMM and the NSU Art Museum of Ft. Lauderdale. Cortada has also developed numerous collaborative art projects globally, including peace murals in Cyprus and Northern Ireland, child welfare murals in Bolivia and Panama, AIDS murals in Geneva and South Africa, and eco-art projects in Taiwan and Holland. His studio is located in Pinecrest Gardens. For more information please visit www.cortada.com

 

About Creative Pinellas

At Creative Pinellas our mission is to facilitate a vibrant, integrated, collaborative and sustainable Pinellas County Arts Community and cultural destination. We strive to be the premier Local Arts Agency, recognized locally and globally for our contribution to arts and culture. We are focused on creating vibrant communities; supporting artists, arts organizations and the creative community; supporting economic development; showcasing Pinellas County as a cultural destination, and making arts and creative expression and experience available to all. As the County’s Local Arts Agency, Creative Pinellas and the programs we deliver are funded by the Pinellas County Board of County Commissioners, Visit St Petersburg / Clearwater, the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and by sales of the State of the Arts specialty license plate in Pinellas County.

 

Creative Pinellas and Arctic Cycle present “90N,” a solo exhibition of works created by Xavier Cortada at the North Pole in June 2008

90N:     Main | Event | Gallery | Press
Galleries:     Arctic Ice Paintings | Native Flags | Endangered World | Longitudinal Installation | North Pole Dinner Party

 


Creative Pinellas
and Arctic Cycle present

90N:

North Pole Installations

by

Xavier Cortada

at

Gallery at Creative Pinellas
12211 Walsingham Road
Largo, FL 33778

Exhibit runs  June 29, 2018 through September 2, 2018

 

 

Ten years ago, Cortada’s ice breaker easily pushed through the then-thinning polar ice, surprising the crew at its early arrival in the North Pole. Arctic warming has since continued melting sea ice at frightening speed:   “Within two decades” stated the artist, “I will be able to repeat the journey on a sailboat, because scientists tell us the Arctic Ocean will be ice-free during summer. Global Climate Change will not just melt the Arctic, it will irrevocably change the world below.”

“I bring this exhibition to the people of Florida to draw the alarming connection between the Arctic and our peninsula,” said Cortada. “Melting ice will have catastrophic effects across our state and weaken the Gulf Stream. Arctic warming will lead to sea level rise, more coastal flooding, prolonged heatwaves, relentless rain, stalled tropical storms, extreme weather and more intense fire seasons.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

About the Artist

Xavier Cortada created art installations at the North Pole and South Pole to address environmental concerns at every point in between. He’s been commissioned to create art for CERN, the White House, the World Bank, Miami City Hall, Miami-Dade County Hall, Florida Botanical Gardens, Port Everglades, Florida’s Turnpike, the Museum of Florida History, the Frost Science Museum and Miami-Dade Children’s Courthouse. Locally, his work is in the permanent collection of the Frost Art Museum, PAMM and the NSU Art Museum of Ft. Lauderdale. Cortada has also developed numerous collaborative art projects globally, including peace murals in Cyprus and Northern Ireland, child welfare murals in Bolivia and Panama, AIDS murals in Geneva and South Africa, and eco-art projects in Taiwan and Holland. His studio is located in Pinecrest Gardens. Learn more at www.cortada.com

 

About Creative Pinellas

At Creative Pinellas our mission is to facilitate a vibrant, integrated, collaborative and sustainable Pinellas County Arts Community and cultural destination. We strive to be the premier Local Arts Agency, recognized locally and globally for our contribution to arts and culture. We are focused on creating vibrant communities; supporting artists, arts organizations and the creative community; supporting economic development; showcasing Pinellas County as a cultural destination, and making arts and creative expression and experience available to all. As the County’s Local Arts Agency, Creative Pinellas and the programs we deliver are funded by the Pinellas County Board of County Commissioners, Visit St Petersburg / Clearwater, the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and by sales of the State of the Arts specialty license plate in Pinellas County.  Learn more at www.CreativePinellas.org.

About The Arctic Cycle

The Arctic Cycle uses theatre to foster dialogue about our global climate crisis, create an empowering vision of the future, and inspire people to take action. Operating on the principle that complex problems must be addressed through collaborative efforts, we work with artists across disciplines and geographic borders, solicit input from earth and social scientists, and actively seek community and educational partners. We manifest this mission through our ongoing initiatives, including Artists & Climate Change. Through the publication of essays, interviews, and editorials, the blog and international network Artists & Climate Change creates community and promotes the inclusion of the arts in the global climate change conversation. Since its launch in 2013, A&CC has become an educational resource for art, environment, and social change classes.  Learn more at www.arcticcycle.org.

 

About the NYFA 

Cortada implemented his “90N” installations at the North Pole in 2008 as an NYFA sponsored-artist.New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) is a nonprofit service organization that empowers working artists and emerging arts organizations across all disciplines at critical stages in their creative lives and professional/organizational development. NYFA Fiscal Sponsorship increases the funding opportunities of individual artists and artist-run organizations by allowing them to raise funds using NYFA’s tax-exempt status.  Learn more at www.nyfa.org.

 

 

Artistree Gallery: “Water Paintings,” an exhibition of works created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest by Xavier Cortada

 

“Water Paintings”

an exhibition of works
created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
by


Xavier Cortada

at

Artistree Gallery
2095 Pomfret Road
South Pomfret, VT 05067

Closing reception: Saturday, July 14th, 5-7pm with Cuban inspired appetizers and drinks.

Exhibit Dates: June 26th – July 14th

This exhibit is part of Artistree’s Cuban Cultural Festival on July 14th.

 

Xavier Cortada’s “Water Paintings” exhibition at Pinecrest Gardens in 2018.

 

img_3703

Xavier Cortada works with Hydrologist Mark Green to create “Water Paintings” at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

WATER PAINTINGS

Water Paintings allowed me to give water at Hubbard Brook’s nine watersheds a voice.  In the work, I made water the protagonist.  In June 2016, I placed nine pencil drawings and nine pieces of watercolor paper inside nylon mesh.  I then tied the mesh bags to a rope at each of the nine weirs at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and left them there for a period of 16 weeks in 2016.  The water flowing through the mesh stained the paper inside.  Water samples and water data were collected by scientists over the same 16-week period from the same nine weirs.  The final work included water samples, data, even the residue in filters.  I wanted audiences to see the water, what the water did, and what it painted as it flowed and transported materials down the stream.”

Xavier Cortada

 

img_3740

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

 

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Small first-order watersheds can show us how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Chemical concentrations combined with stream flow provides data on stream-water element flux for each watershed.

Water samples and data collected by scientists over a 16-week period from all nine watersheds hang on the walls CLIMA.

Nine sets of “Water Paintings” hang from the ceiling. Cortada created each using the same water scientists study. He placed watercolor paper in mesh and tied it to a rope in each of the nine weirs. The works depict 4 months of streamflow.

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.
History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

 

 

 

About the artist:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

 

{in water} exhibition at Pinecrest Gardens

 

Xavier Cortada’s “Diatom Court,” the site-specific ceramic installation Pinecrest Gardens

 

Xavier Cortada, “{in water}: (P),” 12″ x 16″, archival ink on paper, signed, numbered, limited edition print / edition of 5, 2018..

“{in water}”

a solo exhibition of works
by

Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from May 3 through August 3rd, 2018

 

Summer Hours:
In the gallery (main entrance): Weekends only
Please call 305-669-6990 to see when the gallery is open to the public

In the studio (cottage): 
Weekdays 11 am to 2 pm and, as of 6/23, Sundays 9 am to 2 pm.
Please call Amanda Delaplaine at 305-858-1323 or email her at info@hibiscusgallery.com to schedule an appointment

Opening reception
May 4th, 2018
7 to 10 pm

 

{in water} 

Diatoms are water-bound, single-celled symmetrical organisms encapsulated in silica.  They harness the power of the sun to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen and are responsible for generating for one-third of the air we breathe.

Its shell, all that remains from the diatom that lived in the past, is used by scientists today to see what was as they research crucial environmental issues in the century to come.  Scientists—and artists—can determine the past salinity of water by examining the glass shells of diatoms preserved in sedimentary core samples.

Each diatom species has a different salinity preference, so changes in the mixture of fresh and sea water (driven by sea level and changes in water management) can be inferred from past diatom remains.

Xavier Cortada collaborated with Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) scientists to better understand the impact of global climate change on our ecosystems. The works in the {in water} exhibition are inspired by their scientific research.

Diatom,” (2014), is his first work ever depicting a diatom: Using a microscope, Cortada captured the image of a diatom from samples used by Florida International University FCE LTER scientiststo study the ecology of the Everglades and sea level rise.  In the art, Cortada’s diatoms hover over a layer of images (Cortada captured using Google maps) showing the artificial canals and lakes created to develop parcels of developable land where the River of Grass once flowed.

His latest diatom-themed work, “Diatom Court” (2018), is outside the Hibiscus Gallery in the gardens. On Earth Day 2018, it was unveiled as a permanent, site-specific, ceramic installation on the grounds of Pinecrest Gardens.

 

Xavier Cortada, “Diatom,” archival ink on aluminum, 36in x 18in, 2014 (edition 1 of 5).

About the artist:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

His studio is located at Pinecrest Gardens.

 

 

Native Flags: 9th Annual Earth Day Celebration in every Miami-Dade County public school

On April 7th, 2010, students from Filer Middle School in Hialeah planted a sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera) and Native Flag on campus and adopted their own buttonwood and firebush trees/flags to plant at their homes. See www.nativeflags.org. 

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Celebrates Earth Day 2018

At its meeting of February 21, 2018 the School Board approved Board Item H-4 proffered by School Board Member Perla Tabares Hantman, endorsing April 22, 2018 as Earth Day in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

For the ninth year in a row, we are proud to again partner with local artist Xavier Cortada and local organizations on an Earth Day project through which all schools will be able to plant a native tree on campus, together with the symbolic posting of a land reclamation flag. Other partners in this native tree canopy enhancement project include Florida International University College of Arts, Sciences & Education (CASE)│School of Environment, Arts and Society (SEAS), FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA), FIU Libraries│Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), Pinecrest Gardens, Frost Science, and the Deering Estate. In addition, students will be afforded the opportunity to interpret Earth Day by designing their own flag.

Celebrations are scheduled as follows on Thursday, April 19, 2018 at two featured public schools:

  • Gulfstream Elementary
    20900 SW 97th Avenue
    Cutler Bay, Florida  33189
    Phone: (305) 235- 6811
    Time: 9:00 am
  • Citrus Grove Elementary
    2121 NW 5th Street
    Miami, Florida 33125
    Phone: (305) 642-4141
    Time: 1:30 pm

Starting on April 19th photos of the tree planting and flag posting activities can be uploaded by the schools at: http://nativeflags.org/participant-upload/

For more information on this year’s Earth Day celebration or the land reclamation project go to www.NativeFlags.org or call 305-995-4646.

 

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags: North Pole,” 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

“Water Paintings,” an exhibition of works created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest by Xavier Cortada

 

“Water Paintings”

an exhibition of works
created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
by


Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from March 30th through April 29th, 2018

 Opening reception: April 8th from noon to 2pm

 

Xavier Cortada’s “Water Paintings” exhibition at Pinecrest Gardens.

 

img_3703

Xavier Cortada works with Hydrologist Mark Green to create “Water Paintings” at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

WATER PAINTINGS

Water Paintings allowed me to give water at Hubbard Brook’s nine watersheds a voice.  In the work, I made water the protagonist.  In June 2016, I placed nine pencil drawings and nine pieces of watercolor paper inside nylon mesh.  I then tied the mesh bags to a rope at each of the nine weirs at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and left them there for a period of 16 weeks in 2016.  The water flowing through the mesh stained the paper inside.  Water samples and water data were collected by scientists over the same 16-week period from the same nine weirs.  The final work included water samples, data, even the residue in filters.  I wanted audiences to see the water, what the water did, and what it painted as it flowed and transported materials down the stream.”

Xavier Cortada

 

img_3740

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

 

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Small first-order watersheds can show us how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Chemical concentrations combined with stream flow provides data on stream-water element flux for each watershed.

Water samples and data collected by scientists over a 16-week period from all nine watersheds hang on the walls CLIMA.

Nine sets of “Water Paintings” hang from the ceiling. Cortada created each using the same water scientists study. He placed watercolor paper in mesh and tied it to a rope in each of the nine weirs. The works depict 4 months of streamflow.

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.
History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

 

 

 

About the artist:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

 

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation” during Power of Arts Museum at Sweetwater

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation”

 

 

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007

Longitudinal Installation,” created by Cortada a decade ago as part of his NSF Antarctic Artists and Writers Program residency in Antarctica, will be performed by Sweetwater Elementary School students on May 24th at 7 pm.  The performance and activity is co-presented by the Reclamation Projects with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

Participate by following these steps:

1. Find a group of 24 people to perform the Longitudinal Installation ritual with and engage in the performance.
Click here to download instructions.

2. Document the performance with photos and video.

3. Upload photo on www.facebook.com/longitudinalinstallation

4.  Add the “25th quote.”

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007 (Listen: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.xaviercortada.com/resource/resmgr/longitudinal_installation_no.mp3)

24 Global Voices

longitude11x17_graphicThese quotes taken from newspapers across 24 time zones that talking about the impact of climate change on that individual’s life. After Xavier Cortada completed the Longitudinal Installation at the South Pole, he walked to the 0 degree longitude, the prime meridian, and walked clockwise around the pole. He stopped at each shoe to recite each of the following quotes:

 

0°, Spain:
“There may be a move of wineries into the Pyrenees in the future.”
— Xavier Sort, technical director of Miguel Torres Wineries.

15° E, Switzerland:
“Losses to insurers from environmental events have risen exponentially over the past 30 years, and are expected to rise even more rapidly still.”
— Pamela Heck, Insurance Industry Expert.

30° E, Zimbabwe:
“We used to be able to grow everything we want but that has all changed.”
— Matsapi Nyathi, Grandmother.

45° E, Turkey:
“We are helpless. We’re trying to rescue trapped people while also trying to evacuate flood waters that have inundated hundreds of houses.”
— Muharrem Ergul, Mayor, Beykoz district of Istanbul.

60° E, Iran:
“More than 90 percent of our wetlands have completely dried up.”
— Alamdar Alamdari, environmental researcher, Fars Province.

75° E, Maldives:
“In the worst case scenario, we’ll have to move.”
— Foreign Ministry spokesman Ahmed Shaheed.

90° E, Tibet, China:
“The Sherpas of Khumbu may not know everything, but they are suffering the consequences of the people’s greed. We mountain people should be careful and take precautions. If we don’t save Khumbu today our fresh water will dry up and the problem will be impossible to solve in the future.”
— Ngawang Tenzing Jangpo, the Abbot of Tengboche monastery.

105° E, Borneo, Indonesia:
“There’s been no rain, it’s horrible. The governor’s office has instructed schools and offices to close until further notice.”
— Hidayat, government official.

120° E, Philippines:
“The disaster covered almost every corner of this province – rampaging floods, falling trees, damaged houses. It happened very rapidly and many people did not expect this because they haven’t experienced mud flows in those areas before.”
— Fernando Gonzalez, governor of Albay province.

135° E, Japan:
“It’s no exaggeration to say that Japan faces a critical situation when describing the rapid decline of marine supply in its domestic waters that is linked to seaweed loss. Tengusa (seaweed) provides food for marine species.”
— Tomohiro Takase, head of the fisheries department at the Hachijojima municipality.

150° E, Great Barrier Reef, Australia:
“In 20 years’ time, bleaching is highly likely to be annual and that will cause shallow-water corals to be in decline. We need to start working out how we can help people who rely on it for their income. It’s really quite a stunning fact.”
— Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, director of the Centre for Marine Studies at the University of Queensland.

165° E, Micronesia:
“We have nowhere to go.”
— Ben Namakin, Environmental Educator.

180°, Tuvalu: “Tuvalu is the first victim of global warming.”
— Koloa Talake, former prime minister.

165° W , Niue: “Yesterday morning we woke up to a scene of so much devastation, it was just unbelievable. Cyclone Heta was just so fast, furious and ruthless.”
— Cecelia Talagi, Government Secretary.

150° W, Alaska, USA:
“We are at a crossroads. . . Is it practical to stand and fight our Mother Ocean? Or do we surrender and move?”
— Shishmaref Mayor Edith Vorderstrasse.

135° W, Yukon, Canada:
“The weather is really unpredictable and the ice freezes much later and breaks up earlier. There are more incidents of hunters falling through the ice.”
— Kik Shappa, Hunter, Griese Fiord, Canada.

120° W Nunavut, Canada:
“Our cultural heritage is at stake here. We are an adaptable people. We have over the millennium been able to adapt to incredible circumstances. But I think adaptability has its limits. If the ice is not forming, how else does one adapt to seasons that are not as they used to be when the whole environment is changing underneath our feet, literally?”
— Sheila Watt-Cloutier, president of the circumpolar conference.

105° W, Colorado, USA:
“In Colorado, climate change means less snow, less water, more wildfires, less biodiversity and less economic opportunity, as there is less water available for development.”
— Stephen Saunders, president, Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.

90° W, Nicaragua:
“I closed my eyes and prayed to God.”
— Mariana González, Hurricane Mitch survivor.

75° W, Peru:
“I tell my wife the day that mountain loses its snow, we will have to move out of the valley.”
— Jose Ignacio Lambarri, farmer, Urubamba Valley.

60° W, Argentina:
“The flooding has forced us to redesign routes. We thought it would be for a short period of time, but it has been almost six years.”
— Carlos Avellaneda, manager of a trucking company.

45° W, Brazil:
“I am very frightened. One thing goes wrong, and the entire system follows.”
— Jair Souto, Mayor of Manaquiri.

30° W, Greenland:
“They tell us that we must not eat mattak [whale blubber], but this is all we know. Eating Inughuit food makes us who we are, and anyway we have nothing else to eat!”
— Tekummeq, Town of Qaanaaq.

15° W, Maurtitania:
“We are only eating one meal a day. When there is not enough food, it is the young and the old that get fed first.”
— Fatimitu Mint Eletou, Bouchamo.


Regis House presents: Seahorses exhibit closing event

SeahorsesGallery | Opening InvitationPress release | Closing Invitation

Xavier Cortada, “Seahorse Society: South” 48″ x 36″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

Join us on

Thursday, May 11th, 2017
from 6 pm to 8 pm

for the official closing of

Seahorses

an exhibit by

Xavier Cortada

at

Pinecrest Gardens
Historic Entrance

11000 S Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs April 6 – May 11th, 2017th

 

Proceeds from sales will benefit Regis House.
As a law student, Cortada served as Executive Director of the adolescent drug and alcohol abuse center.

Founded in 1984, Regis House is a non-profit, 501(c)(3), charitable, community-based organization with the mission to improve lives for a healthy community through mental health, family support and substance abuse services.  Regis House, Inc. has served more than 70,000 families throughout Miami-Dade County since its inception.  Programs and services such as co-occurring psychiatric/mental health, substance abuse services, individual, group, and family counseling/therapy, school-based prevention programs, and public assistance programs are many of the programs, and services the agency has to offer.