“Florida is…” on exhibit at top of State’s Capitol

“Florida Is…” by Xavier Cortada

Conceptualized during Xavier Cortada‘s residency at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artist Residency in Captiva, Florida, “Florida is…” is an evolving body of work that depicts the natural beauty of Florida.  It asks Floridians to define their state by its actual nature, not by things we do and build to displace it.  Some “Florida is…” works hang as public art in public venues, admonishing viewers to find better ways to coexist with nature.

The project invites participants to capture and share their images and perspectives on the project’s online platform.

 

You are cordially invited to

Florida is…

a solo show by

Xavier Cortada

at

22nd Floor Gallery
State Capitol
Tallahassee, FL

Exhibit runs December 1st,  2018 through March 31st, 2019

 

PARTICIPATE: Help others understand and appreciate Florida’s natural beauty.  Upload an image of your favorite animal, plant or place to www.floridaisnature.com and tell us why we should all care for it and strive to protect it.  We will share it on our website and social media.  We will also ask you to help us spread the word and get others to see that “Florida is… Nature.”

Xavier Cortada, “(Florida is…) Wood storks,” archival ink on aluminum, 60″ x 40”, 2016 (www.floridaisnature.com)

About Florida Is Nature

Conceptualized during Xavier Cortada‘s residency at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artist Residency in Captiva, Florida, “Florida is…” is an evolving body of work that depicts the natural beauty of Florida.  It asks Floridians to define their state by its actual nature, not by things we do and build to displace it.  Some “Florida is…” works hang as public art in public venues, admonishing viewers to find better ways to coexist with nature.

The project invites participants to capture and share their images and perspectives on the project’s online platform.

In 2015, Cortada created three permanent “Florida is” public art installations in three turnpike plazas, making them cultural destinations in and of themselves.  Each focused on a different aspect of the sunshine state’s natural beauty:  Endangered Animals  (Ft. Drum Plaza),  Diatoms  (Turkey Lake Plaza), and Wildflowers (West Palm Beach Plaza).

“It is important to have the artwork connect with our local environment, and I believe that [Cortada’s] art does that in a very sophisticated way,” said architect Bernard Zyscovich in reviewing Cortada’s public art proposal for the plazas he designed. “Additionally, I love the idea of generating a series of “take aways” from [Cortada’s art] plazas and hopefully from the other plazas as well.  I think that it reinforces the plaza experience as something that adds value to each visitor’s experience.“

Merchandise  is branded with “Florida is” information so that it serves as a catalysts for conversations to address our state’s environmental concerns.

You can learn more about the artist by visiting www.cortada.com

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“Water Paintings,” a solo exhibition of works created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

“Water Paintings”

a solo exhibition of works
created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
by


Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from March 26th through April 29th, 2018

WATER PAINTINGS

img_3703

Xavier Cortada works with Hydrologist Mark Green to create “Water Paintings” at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

 

Water Paintings allowed me to give water at Hubbard Brook’s nine watersheds a voice.  In the work, I made water the protagonist.  In June 2016, I placed nine pencil drawings and nine pieces of watercolor paper inside nylon mesh.  I then tied the mesh bags to a rope at each of the nine weirs at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and left them there for a period of 16 weeks in 2016.  The water flowing through the mesh stained the paper inside.  Water samples and water data were collected by scientists over the same 16-week period from the same nine weirs.  The final work included water samples, data, even the residue in filters.  I wanted audiences to see the water, what the water did, and what it painted as it flowed and transported materials down the stream.”

Xavier Cortada

 

img_3740

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

 

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Small first-order watersheds can show us how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Chemical concentrations combined with stream flow provides data on stream-water element flux for each watershed.

Water samples and data collected by scientists over a 16-week period from all nine watersheds hang on the walls CLIMA.

Nine sets of “Water Paintings” hang from the ceiling. Cortada created each using the same water scientists study. He placed watercolor paper in mesh and tied it to a rope in each of the nine weirs. The works depict 4 months of streamflow.

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.
History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

 

 

 

About the artist:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

 

“Mangroves,” a group exhibition at Pinecrest Gardens

 

“Mangroves”

a group exhibition of works by


Xavier Cortada

and

Josh Liberman

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

 

Join Xavier Cortada in the Garden at noon on January 21st, 2018 to dedicate the Diatom sculpture.

Meet Cortada and Liberman along with the artists of the Miami River Show in the Hibuscus Gallery  at 12:30 pm on January 21st, 2018 for the opening of exhibition opening.

Exhibit runs January 18th through February 19th, 2018

 

About the artists:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada’s engaged science-art practice is based at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangroves, native trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland) projects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.  His studio is located at Pinecrest Gardens.

Learn more about his work at www.cortada.com.

 

Josh Liberman:

Josh Liberman is a photographer whose roots lie in the outdoors.  He was raised in Melbourne, FL, where he developed an early fascination and love for the sea and the natural world. He studied Biology at the University of Miami and has since been building an impressive portfolio of natural elements around the world.
Liberman works with a variety of conservation-minded brands and organizations.  His work has been featured by Discovery Channel, The Smithsonian, Thrillist, and many more.  He currently serves as staff photographer for the University of Miami Shark Research and Conservation lab.  Learn more about his work at www.joshliberman.com

 

“Florida is Nature” Artist Talks with Guest Scientists at Pinecrest Gardens


Xavier Cortada will be presenting monthly  Florida is Nature Artist Talks with Guest Scientists and interactive experiences at The Hibiscus Gallery in Pinecrest Gardens, where his studio is located.  In his capacity as artist-in-residence, Cortada implements his Florida is Nature participatory art program onsite.  Each month, Cortada will invite a different Florida International University School of Environment, Arts and Society research scientist as a special guest to join him in a public art science conversation and to discuss environmental issues and his/her work. The artist talks and interactive experiences are free with paid admission to the garden on the select dates below.  After the talk, visitors are invited to walk the garden and engage in the Florida is Nature participatory art project.

 

 

Pinecrest Gardens
FIU School of Environment, Arts & Society
FIU College of Communications, Architecture + The Arts

FIU Libraries
and
FIU Digital Library of the Caribbean

cordially invite you to join us for our monthly

Florida is Nature Artist Talk

by

Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens

11000 S.W. 57th Avenue
Pinecrest, FL 33156

305-669-6990

Talk is free with $5 admission to the Gardens.
After the talk, walk the garden and participate in “Florida is Nature.”  

The dates of the Florida is Nature art – science talks are:

Artist Talks 2017

Monday, September 11th, 2017 at 10:30a:
[ Cancelled due to Hurricane Irma ]

Monday, October 16th, 2017 at 10:30a:
FLORIDA IS… Nature

Tuesday, November 29th, 2017 at 10:30a
FLORIDA IS… Mangroves

Thursday, December 7th, 2017 at 10:30a
FLORIDA IS… Endangered Species

Artist Talks 2018

Wednesday, February 14th, 2017 at 10:30a
FLORIDA IS… Seagrasses

Wednesday, March 14th, 2017 at 10:30a
FLORIDA IS…

Wednesday, April 11th, 2017 at 10:30a
FLORIDA IS…

Wednesday, May 9th,2017 at 10:30a
FLORIDA IS…

The art-science talks and interactive experiences are free with paid admission to the garden on the select dates below.  After the talk, visitors are invited to walk the garden and engage in the Florida is Nature participatory art project.  The gallery is located at the entrance of Pinecrest Gardens – 11000 Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156.  We also welcome community groups and high school students to attend the artist’s talks. If you are interested in scheduling a group for one of the dates below, please contact Lacey Bray, educational programs coordinator, at lbray@pinecrest-fl.gov or 305-669-6990 for more information.

 

Monthtly Florida is Nature artist talks and community programs are presented by: 

 Image above:
Xavier Cortada, “Puzzled Landscape: Florida is… Wildflowers” digital art, 2015

About Florida Is Nature

Conceptualized during Xavier Cortada‘s residency at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artist Residency in Captiva, Florida, “Florida is…” is an evolving body of work that depicts the natural beauty of Florida. It asks Floridians to define their state by its natural environment, not by the edifices and man-made encroachments that displace nature.  Some “Florida is…” works hang as public art in public venues, admonishing viewers to find better ways to coexist with nature.

The project invites participants to capture and share their images and perspectives on the project’s online platform.

Xavier Cortada, “Luster (Diatoms series- high noon), archival ink on aluminum, 2015

 

“Florida Is…” by Xavier Cortada

Through Florida is Nature,”  Pinecrest Gardens artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada portrays Florida’s environment to connect viewers with our state’s natural beauty.  Come see the works on permanent display at the Hibiscus Gallery in Pinecrest Gardens.

You too can participate in “Florida is…”  Help others understand and appreciate Florida’s natural beauty.  Upload an image of your favorite animal, plant or place to www.floridaisnature.com and tell us why we should all care for it and strive to protect it.  We will share it on our website and social media.  We will also ask you to help us spread the word and get others to see that “Florida is… Nature.”

 

You can learn more about the artist by visiting www.cortada.com

 

“Temperature Check: Body of Evidence” exhibit in San José

Temperature Check: Body of Evidence
(September 1 – November 12, 2017)

More than 50 percent of Latinos in the United States see climate change as a key defining issue due to its far-reaching impact within the Latino community. Temperature Check: Body of Evidence will feature the work of Latino artists exploring the artifacts and patterns of climate change through installation, drawing, video and photography. The exhibition will also include a platform for education and exchange with our local community through a series of public programs including guest speakers, panel discussions and family programs to further strategies for discussion and action around issues of sustainability.  Xavier Cortada’s “Diatoms” and “DO NOT OPEN” will be presented as part of the group exhibition.

Diatoms

Xavier Cortada, “Diatoms,”  one-hundred diatom works on framed flat tile (each 6″ x 6″), 2017.

Diatoms are single-celled organisms that live in the water and harness the power of the sun to convert CO2 into oxygen. Its glass shell, all that remains from the diatom, is used by scientists today to see what was as they research environmental issues crucial to the city in the century to come. Scientists—and artists—can determine the past salinity of water by examining the shells of diatoms preserved in sedimentary core samples. Each diatom species has a different salinity preference, so changes in the mixture of fresh and sea water (driven by sea level and changes in water management) can be inferred from past diatom remains.

 


DO NOT OPEN | San José 2117

Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.During the opening reception, MACLA  invites attendees to participate in Cortada’s “DO NOT OPEN” performance.  The work was first exhibited last year during the CLIMA exhibit. Here are the instructions.

  • Participant Instructions:

      • Walk up to the “DO NOT OPEN” wall in the MACLA Temperature Check
      • Close your eyes: Imagine San José 100 years in the future. Imagine the people living here then. Imagine how rising seas will impact the city and those who will live here then.
      • Think about what you would like them to know. Think about what someone living in San José in 2117 would want to hear from someone living here in 2017.
      • Unclip a piece of blank paper and envelope from the “DO NOT OPEN” wall and use a pencil to write it all down:

     

    Tell them who you are.
    Tell them why you are writing to them.
    Tell them what you thought, what you saw.
    Tell them what you felt, what you feared.
    Tell them what you did, what you hoped for.
    Tell them what you want them to do.

     

    • Fold your handwritten letter in two, kiss it, place it inside the envelope and seal it. Sign and date the back of your envelope and write the words:
      “DO NOT OPEN until 2117”
    • Clip the sealed envelope to the “DO NOT OPEN” wall with the handwritten words facing out.
    • Stare at your envelope for 100 seconds. Visualize the changes rising seas will bring over each of the next 100 years. Think of how your words will be received in San José in 2117.
    • Walk away.

     

Artist’s statement:

In “DO NOT OPEN,” I ask residents of San Jose to write letters to the future. I do so because today, many of their neighbors aren’t willing to listen. Today, too many are in denial about the human impact on global climate change. For many, denial comes easier than visualizing the future impact of rising seas on their community. Our words fall on deaf ears.

So, instead, we must write it all down, keep it in a safe place, and share it later, when others are willing to listen.

Although the letters are intended for people not yet born, the true audience is those breathing in the present.

Sure, the future will be curious.
The future will read our letters and want to know why we couldn’t show restraint when facing insurmountable evidence of our role in creating this global crisis.

The future will be incredulous.
In 2117, our great-grandchildren will read the words we wrote them and want to understand why we didn’t do more when so much—everything– was at stake.

The future will be furious.
A century from now, San Jose will read what we penned and want to know how, on our watch, ecosystems collapsed, biodiversity plummeted and so much of humanity suffered.

The future will benefit from insights, but “DO NOT OPEN” isn’t for them. It’s not about them. It’s about us.

I’m less interested in them being able to hear us. And more interested in us being able to see them. By writing to them, we name them. By writing to them, we can’t deny their existence. By writing to them, we create a connection to them.

Being able to connect with our progeny raises the stakes for us now in 2017. It lengthens the “care horizon” beyond our lifetime. It provides a path to hope, purpose. It encourages us to do all we can now to protect our planet, its future generations and the animals we coevolved with.

— Xavier Cortada

Marking “I have a dream”

Xavier Cortada, “The Markers, 1963,” South Pole, 2007.

On Aug. 28, 1963, this point (marked by the flag) on the moving ice sheet that blankets the South Pole stood at 90 degrees South, while the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made his “I Have a Dream” speech , in front of the Lincoln Memorial at 38’53” North, 77’02” West.

See http://www.xaviercortada.com/?Ant_Markers

Here is the text of his speech:

***

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we’ve come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.”

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: “For Whites Only.” We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest — quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day — this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning:

My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.

Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride,

From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.

And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.

From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at last!

Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation” during Power of Arts Museum at Sweetwater

Sweetwater Elementary to perform “Longitudinal Installation”

 

 

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007

Longitudinal Installation,” created by Cortada a decade ago as part of his NSF Antarctic Artists and Writers Program residency in Antarctica, will be performed by Sweetwater Elementary School students on May 24th at 7 pm.  The performance and activity is co-presented by the Reclamation Projects with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

Participate by following these steps:

1. Find a group of 24 people to perform the Longitudinal Installation ritual with and engage in the performance.
Click here to download instructions.

2. Document the performance with photos and video.

3. Upload photo on www.facebook.com/longitudinalinstallation

4.  Add the “25th quote.”

Xavier Cortada, The Longitudinal Installation (at the South Pole), 2007 (Listen: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.xaviercortada.com/resource/resmgr/longitudinal_installation_no.mp3)

24 Global Voices

longitude11x17_graphicThese quotes taken from newspapers across 24 time zones that talking about the impact of climate change on that individual’s life. After Xavier Cortada completed the Longitudinal Installation at the South Pole, he walked to the 0 degree longitude, the prime meridian, and walked clockwise around the pole. He stopped at each shoe to recite each of the following quotes:

 

0°, Spain:
“There may be a move of wineries into the Pyrenees in the future.”
— Xavier Sort, technical director of Miguel Torres Wineries.

15° E, Switzerland:
“Losses to insurers from environmental events have risen exponentially over the past 30 years, and are expected to rise even more rapidly still.”
— Pamela Heck, Insurance Industry Expert.

30° E, Zimbabwe:
“We used to be able to grow everything we want but that has all changed.”
— Matsapi Nyathi, Grandmother.

45° E, Turkey:
“We are helpless. We’re trying to rescue trapped people while also trying to evacuate flood waters that have inundated hundreds of houses.”
— Muharrem Ergul, Mayor, Beykoz district of Istanbul.

60° E, Iran:
“More than 90 percent of our wetlands have completely dried up.”
— Alamdar Alamdari, environmental researcher, Fars Province.

75° E, Maldives:
“In the worst case scenario, we’ll have to move.”
— Foreign Ministry spokesman Ahmed Shaheed.

90° E, Tibet, China:
“The Sherpas of Khumbu may not know everything, but they are suffering the consequences of the people’s greed. We mountain people should be careful and take precautions. If we don’t save Khumbu today our fresh water will dry up and the problem will be impossible to solve in the future.”
— Ngawang Tenzing Jangpo, the Abbot of Tengboche monastery.

105° E, Borneo, Indonesia:
“There’s been no rain, it’s horrible. The governor’s office has instructed schools and offices to close until further notice.”
— Hidayat, government official.

120° E, Philippines:
“The disaster covered almost every corner of this province – rampaging floods, falling trees, damaged houses. It happened very rapidly and many people did not expect this because they haven’t experienced mud flows in those areas before.”
— Fernando Gonzalez, governor of Albay province.

135° E, Japan:
“It’s no exaggeration to say that Japan faces a critical situation when describing the rapid decline of marine supply in its domestic waters that is linked to seaweed loss. Tengusa (seaweed) provides food for marine species.”
— Tomohiro Takase, head of the fisheries department at the Hachijojima municipality.

150° E, Great Barrier Reef, Australia:
“In 20 years’ time, bleaching is highly likely to be annual and that will cause shallow-water corals to be in decline. We need to start working out how we can help people who rely on it for their income. It’s really quite a stunning fact.”
— Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, director of the Centre for Marine Studies at the University of Queensland.

165° E, Micronesia:
“We have nowhere to go.”
— Ben Namakin, Environmental Educator.

180°, Tuvalu: “Tuvalu is the first victim of global warming.”
— Koloa Talake, former prime minister.

165° W , Niue: “Yesterday morning we woke up to a scene of so much devastation, it was just unbelievable. Cyclone Heta was just so fast, furious and ruthless.”
— Cecelia Talagi, Government Secretary.

150° W, Alaska, USA:
“We are at a crossroads. . . Is it practical to stand and fight our Mother Ocean? Or do we surrender and move?”
— Shishmaref Mayor Edith Vorderstrasse.

135° W, Yukon, Canada:
“The weather is really unpredictable and the ice freezes much later and breaks up earlier. There are more incidents of hunters falling through the ice.”
— Kik Shappa, Hunter, Griese Fiord, Canada.

120° W Nunavut, Canada:
“Our cultural heritage is at stake here. We are an adaptable people. We have over the millennium been able to adapt to incredible circumstances. But I think adaptability has its limits. If the ice is not forming, how else does one adapt to seasons that are not as they used to be when the whole environment is changing underneath our feet, literally?”
— Sheila Watt-Cloutier, president of the circumpolar conference.

105° W, Colorado, USA:
“In Colorado, climate change means less snow, less water, more wildfires, less biodiversity and less economic opportunity, as there is less water available for development.”
— Stephen Saunders, president, Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.

90° W, Nicaragua:
“I closed my eyes and prayed to God.”
— Mariana González, Hurricane Mitch survivor.

75° W, Peru:
“I tell my wife the day that mountain loses its snow, we will have to move out of the valley.”
— Jose Ignacio Lambarri, farmer, Urubamba Valley.

60° W, Argentina:
“The flooding has forced us to redesign routes. We thought it would be for a short period of time, but it has been almost six years.”
— Carlos Avellaneda, manager of a trucking company.

45° W, Brazil:
“I am very frightened. One thing goes wrong, and the entire system follows.”
— Jair Souto, Mayor of Manaquiri.

30° W, Greenland:
“They tell us that we must not eat mattak [whale blubber], but this is all we know. Eating Inughuit food makes us who we are, and anyway we have nothing else to eat!”
— Tekummeq, Town of Qaanaaq.

15° W, Maurtitania:
“We are only eating one meal a day. When there is not enough food, it is the young and the old that get fed first.”
— Fatimitu Mint Eletou, Bouchamo.


Regis House presents: Seahorses exhibit closing event

SeahorsesGallery | Opening InvitationPress release | Closing Invitation

Xavier Cortada, “Seahorse Society: South” 48″ x 36″, acrylic on canvas, 2014

Join us on

Thursday, May 11th, 2017
from 6 pm to 8 pm

for the official closing of

Seahorses

an exhibit by

Xavier Cortada

at

Pinecrest Gardens
Historic Entrance

11000 S Red Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs April 6 – May 11th, 2017th

 

Proceeds from sales will benefit Regis House.
As a law student, Cortada served as Executive Director of the adolescent drug and alcohol abuse center.

Founded in 1984, Regis House is a non-profit, 501(c)(3), charitable, community-based organization with the mission to improve lives for a healthy community through mental health, family support and substance abuse services.  Regis House, Inc. has served more than 70,000 families throughout Miami-Dade County since its inception.  Programs and services such as co-occurring psychiatric/mental health, substance abuse services, individual, group, and family counseling/therapy, school-based prevention programs, and public assistance programs are many of the programs, and services the agency has to offer.

Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens Earth Day Festival

 

Reclamation Projects to celebrate Earth Day 2017
by implementing Seahorse Society at Pinecrest Gardens

 

Project Seahorse is partnering with Miami-based eco-artist Xavier Cortada for a community event at Pinecrest Gardens this #EarthDay Weekend. We will be engaging visitors with Seahorses, the magical creatures that call Biscayne National Park and the waters of south Florida their home!

 

Seahorse Society is a participatory art project by Xavier Cortada.  It promotes the educational and research efforts of www.projectseahorse.org

Join us at the Historic Entrance Gallery at Pinecrest Gardens on Earth Day Festival and learn about seahorses. Project Seahorse scientist Emilie Stump will be there to discuss the importance of seahorses in South Florida. Kids will be able draw seahorses and take a pledge to protect them.

The Seahorse Society activity at Pinecrest Gardens during the Earth Day Festival is co-presented by Project Seahorse and by the Participatory Art Projects, Inc. with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.

#magicalcreaturesinourbackyard
#seahorses
#miamiseahorses
#biscaynenationalpark

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450” exhibit

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada
will be exhibiting his Native Flags project (www.nativeflags.org)
and his 2015 work, 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas.
at

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450”

An international symposium and curated exhibit focused on the intersection of science and art.
Exhibit & Special Event on Saturday, April 22, 2017
3:30 pm -10:00 pm; Free and open to the public
Exhibit on display from April 9 – June 26, 2017

 

HIT IT: Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it!,” video screen shot, 2015.
In acknowledgement of the support from the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

 

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it! | Burn it! | Eat it! | Freeze itBury it! video documentation of performance, 2015
Xavier Cortada

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas was created by Xavier Cortada during April-May 2015 during an artist residency at the Rising Seas Confab 2015, Rauschenberg Studio, Captiva, Florida. In this performance, Cortada comments with irony on the weak to non-existent actions being taken to address both the causes and the imminent realities of climate disruption in a State clearly at the epicenter of potential disaster—one which has been caused by inadequate action globally on soaring levels of greenhouse gases related to human activity.

Cortada has long been involved in art that intervenes in, and/or comments upon environmental problems. He has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Poleand direct-impact ecological art projects, in Florida, around the US, and internationally, (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland).

Xavier Cortada is Florida-educated and has lived in Miami since he was three. He is currently Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Science & Education and the College of Communication, Architecture + the Arts. (http://www.cortada.com)

 

ABOUT DEERING ESTATE:

The Deering Estate offers complimentary exhibit evenings, highlighting a variety of contemporary, historic, and visiting exhibitions inside the historic homes. Exhibit Evenings are free of charge and offer the public a chance to interact with artists and curators and to experience a variety of exhibit tours and talks. Exhibit Evenings are held from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, unless otherwise noted. Exhibit on view daily, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Free with Estate Admission.