“Antarctic Ice Paintings” at Hibiscus Gallery

Xavier Cortada, “Antarctic Ice Painting: Antarctica,” melted Antarctic ice, sediment and mixed media on paper, 9″ x 12″, 2007/

“Antarctic Ice Paintings”

a solo exhibition premiering works created in Antarctica in 2007
by

Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from November 8, 2018 through January 6, 2018

Xavier Cortada, recipient of a 2006-2007 National Science Foundation Antarctic Artists and Writers fellowship, traveled to Antarctica to implement a series of projects and installations. While there, the Miami artist created “ice paintings” using glacier and sediment samples provided to him by scientists working in Antarctica.

About the Artist
Xavier Cortada created art installations at the North Pole and South Pole to address environmental concerns at every point in between. He’s been commissioned to create art for CERN, the White House, the World Bank, Miami City Hall, Miami-Dade County Hall, Florida Botanical Gardens, Port Everglades, Florida’s Turpike, the Museum of Florida History, the Frost Science Museum and Miami-Dade Children’s Courthouse. Locally, his work is in the permanent collection of the Frost Art Museum, PAMM and the NSU Art Museum of Ft. Lauderdale. Cortada has also developed numerous collaborative art projects globally, including peace murals in Cyprus and Northern Ireland, child welfare murals in Bolivia and Panama, AIDS murals in Geneva and South Africa, and eco-art projects in Taiwan and Holland. His studio is located in Pinecrest Gardens. For more information please visit www.cortada.com

 

 

Creative Pinellas and Arctic Cycle present “90N,” a solo exhibition of works created by Xavier Cortada at the North Pole in June 2008

90N:     Main | Event | Gallery | Press
 
Galleries:     Antarctic Ice Paintings | Native Flags | Endangered World | Longitudinal Installation | North Pole Dinner Party

 

90N:
North Pole Installations

by

Xavier Cortada

at

Gallery at Creative Pinellas
12211 Walsingham Road
Largo, FL 33778

Exhibit runs  June 29, 2018 through September 2, 2018

 

ARCTIC ICE PAINTINGS

In the summer of 2008, Cortada used Arctic ice to create a series of Ice-paintings aboard a Russian Icebreaker as it made its way back from the North Pole.

 

 

NATIVE FLAGS:

At a time when melting polar sea ice had many focus on which political power control the Arctic (using the Northwest Passage shipping lanes and the petroleum resources beneath the sea ice), Cortada planted a green flag and reclaimed it for nature. To do so, he developed Native Flags, a participatory eco-art project that engages others in planting a green flag and native tree in their homes to prevent the polar regions from melting. Reforestation sequesters carbon from the atmosphere, helping reduce green house gases that warm the planet.  Learn more a twww.nativeflags.org

Xavier Cortada, “Native Flags | North Pole,” 2008. (http://nativeflags.org/native-flags-north-pole/)

 

 

ENDANGERED WORLD:

Cortada highlighted the need to protect our endangered species by placing the names of 360 endangered animals  in a circle around the North Pole, each aligned with longitudinal degree in which the struggle to survive in the world below. Learn more at www.endangeredworld.org

Xavier Cortada, “Endangered World | North Pole,” 2008 (http://endangeredworld.org/north-pole-about/)

 

 

LONGITUDINAL INSTALLATION:

As he did in the South Pole, Mr. Cortada placed 24 shoes in a circle around the North Pole, each shoe representing a person living in a different part of the world affected by climate change. Afterwards, he approached each shoe and recited a statement from each person about the impact of global climate change in their lives.  Learn more at www.longitudinalinstallation.org 

Xavier Cortada, “Longitudinal Installation | North Pole,” 2008. (http://longitudinalinstallation.org/north-pole-installation/)

 

Xavier Cortada, Ice Plate, North Pole Dinner Party (Miami): 90N6 , Sea Ice from the Geographic North Pole, pigment and glaze on ceramic plate, 2008

 

NORTH POLE DINNER PARTY

On June 29th, 2008, Xavier Cortada arrived at the North Pole to create ritualistic installations addressing global climate change and the melting polar caps.  One of Cortada’s performances included a ritual where he fed his fellow travelers pieces of ice collected at the North Pole, thereby integrating the North Pole into their very being.

“I figured that if they ingested a piece of the North Pole, it would become part of them.” said Cortada. “The North Pole water molecules would be swirling through their bodies.  The North Pole atoms would be incorporated into their very cells.  My sense was that after having North Pole communion, they would protect the North Pole.  If nothing else, they would do so for self-preservation.”

 

North Pole Dinner Party/Miami 2008: The Green Project | Claire Oliver Gallery

 

Xavier Cortada, Ice Plate, North Pole Dinner Party (Miami): 90N_ , Sea Ice from the Geographic North Pole, pigment and glaze on ceramic plate, 2008

Artistree Gallery: “Water Paintings,” an exhibition of works created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest by Xavier Cortada

 

“Water Paintings”

an exhibition of works
created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
by


Xavier Cortada

at

Artistree Gallery
2095 Pomfret Road
South Pomfret, VT 05067

Closing reception: Saturday, July 14th, 5-7pm with Cuban inspired appetizers and drinks.

Exhibit Dates: June 26th – July 14th

This exhibit is part of Artistree’s Cuban Cultural Festival on July 14th.

 

Xavier Cortada’s “Water Paintings” exhibition at Pinecrest Gardens in 2018.

 

img_3703

Xavier Cortada works with Hydrologist Mark Green to create “Water Paintings” at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

WATER PAINTINGS

Water Paintings allowed me to give water at Hubbard Brook’s nine watersheds a voice.  In the work, I made water the protagonist.  In June 2016, I placed nine pencil drawings and nine pieces of watercolor paper inside nylon mesh.  I then tied the mesh bags to a rope at each of the nine weirs at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and left them there for a period of 16 weeks in 2016.  The water flowing through the mesh stained the paper inside.  Water samples and water data were collected by scientists over the same 16-week period from the same nine weirs.  The final work included water samples, data, even the residue in filters.  I wanted audiences to see the water, what the water did, and what it painted as it flowed and transported materials down the stream.”

Xavier Cortada

 

img_3740

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

 

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Small first-order watersheds can show us how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Chemical concentrations combined with stream flow provides data on stream-water element flux for each watershed.

Water samples and data collected by scientists over a 16-week period from all nine watersheds hang on the walls CLIMA.

Nine sets of “Water Paintings” hang from the ceiling. Cortada created each using the same water scientists study. He placed watercolor paper in mesh and tied it to a rope in each of the nine weirs. The works depict 4 months of streamflow.

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.
History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

 

 

 

About the artist:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

 

Real-Time Data Visualizations: A 21st Century Confluence of Art, Music and Science at Ecological Research Sites at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest– White Mountains, NH

Real-Time Data Visualizations: A 21st Century Confluence of Art, Music and Science at Ecological Research Sites

Hubbard Brook Water Visualization. See www.waterviz.org

Hypotheses:

  • Multi-sensory experiences such as those evoked by a new generation of data visualizations and sonifications will simultaneously engage the reasoning, visual and acoustical centers of the viewer’s brain, and make pattern and process in large ecological data sets easier to apprehend, providing a foundation for new discoveries.
  • Neurobiological tools and theory can provide a mechanistic understanding for this increased understanding of pattern and process in ecological data.
  • The process of engaging artists and scientists from different disciplines in a discrete and focused project will stimulate new ideas and insights to better address complex environmental problems.

Goals:

(1) Workshop: A two day workshop will be convened at Hubbard Brook, in North Woodstock, NH in October 2015 to convene a select group of scientists, artists, educators, and computer scientists to discuss the grand challenge of authentically integrating the Arts and Sciences, key ecological and societal issues at long term ecological research sites, and prioritization of features for new visualizations and sonifications.

(2) The Waterviz: A Water Cycle Visualization and Sonification Tool: We will redesign the “Waterviz” based on expert input received at the Workshop and an immersive artist-in-residence program for our artist and musician at our two sites: Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH and HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, OR.

(3) Cognitive Science Questions:

Neuroscience: We will implement cognitive neuroscience-based evaluation of Waterviz visualizations, sonifications, and interactive features using low-cost EEG (Emotiv Insight headset), and we will extend the scope of previous cognitive neuroscience evaluation strategies to include information display via sonification (Kramer et al. 2010; Lazar et al. 2013; Degara et al. 2015) thereby evaluating multi-modal approaches to information display (Rimland et al. 2013).

Evaluations: The Waterviz evaluation will be divided into two phases: project process and project products. The evaluation of the project’s process will focus on the research approach and the participation and activities of the project personnel. The key process goals to be evaluated are whether (1) the process of developing the visualization and sonification tools will engage both artists and scientists in a collaboration that builds new, meaningful relationships between members from different disciplines; and (2) this collaborative process will stimulate new ideas and/or insights among project team members about complex datasets, ecological processes, and/or the complexities of multiple ecosystem stressors. The key product goals are to assess (1) if and how this project is successful at intellectually integrating the Arts into the scientific process and (2) whether new ideas, insights, or discoveries result from this integration

(4) Broader Impacts: The project will advance STEM education and increase public scientific literacy and public engagement by developing web-based tools that communicate environmental data from real places in real time. Toward that end, we will involve educators and science communicators in the early design phases of the Waterviz (i.e., October 2015 workshop). The redesigned Waterviz will provide a platform for engagement with the Next Generation Science Standards for education in non-traditional ways.

 

Xavier Cortada, Water Paintings (Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest), 2016

 

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.

History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

{in water} exhibition at Pinecrest Gardens

Xavier Cortada’s “Diatom Court,” the site-specific ceramic installation Pinecrest Gardens

 

Xavier Cortada, “{in water}: (P),” 12″ x 16″, archival ink on paper, signed, numbered, limited edition print / edition of 5, 2018..

“{in water}”

a solo exhibition of works
by

Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from May 3 through August 3rd, 2018


Summer hours:

In the gallery (main entrance): Weekends only
Please call 305-669-6990 to see when gallery is open to the public

In the studio (cottage):
Weekdays 3p to 6p and, as of 6/23, Sundays 9a to 2p.
Please call Amanda Delaplaine at 305-858-1323 or email her at info@hibiscusgallery.com to schedule appointment

Opening reception
May 4th, 2018
7 to 10 pm

{in water} 

Diatoms are water-bound, single-celled symmetrical organisms encapsulated in silica.  They harness the power of the sun to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen and are responsible for generating for one-third of the air we breathe.

Its shell, all that remains from the diatom that lived in the past, is used by scientists today to see what was as they research crucial environmental issues in the century to come.  Scientists—and artists—can determine the past salinity of water by examining the glass shells of diatoms preserved in sedimentary core samples.

Each diatom species has a different salinity preference, so changes in the mixture of fresh and sea water (driven by sea level and changes in water management) can be inferred from past diatom remains.

Xavier Cortada collaborated with Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research (FCE LTER) scientists to better understand the impact of global climate change on our ecosystems. The works in the {in water} exhibition are inspired by their scientific research.

Diatom,” (2014), is his first work ever depicting a diatom: Using a microscope, Cortada captured the image of a diatom from samples used by Florida International University FCE LTER scientiststo study the ecology of the Everglades and sea level rise.  In the art, Cortada’s diatoms hover over a layer of images (Cortada captured using Google maps) showing the artificial canals and lakes created to develop parcels of developable land where the River of Grass once flowed.

His latest diatom-themed work, “Diatom Court” (2018), is outside the Hibiscus Gallery in the gardens. On Earth Day 2018, it was unveiled as a permanent, site-specific, ceramic installation on the grounds of Pinecrest Gardens.

Xavier Cortada, “Diatom,” archival ink on aluminum, 36in x 18in, 2014 (edition 1 of 5).

About the artist:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

His studio is located at Pinecrest Gardens.

 

 

“Water Paintings,” an exhibition of works created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest by Xavier Cortada

 

“Water Paintings”

an exhibition of works
created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
by


Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from March 30th through April 29th, 2018

 Opening reception: April 8th from noon to 2pm

 

Xavier Cortada’s “Water Paintings” exhibition at Pinecrest Gardens.

 

img_3703

Xavier Cortada works with Hydrologist Mark Green to create “Water Paintings” at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

WATER PAINTINGS

Water Paintings allowed me to give water at Hubbard Brook’s nine watersheds a voice.  In the work, I made water the protagonist.  In June 2016, I placed nine pencil drawings and nine pieces of watercolor paper inside nylon mesh.  I then tied the mesh bags to a rope at each of the nine weirs at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and left them there for a period of 16 weeks in 2016.  The water flowing through the mesh stained the paper inside.  Water samples and water data were collected by scientists over the same 16-week period from the same nine weirs.  The final work included water samples, data, even the residue in filters.  I wanted audiences to see the water, what the water did, and what it painted as it flowed and transported materials down the stream.”

Xavier Cortada

 

img_3740

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

 

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Small first-order watersheds can show us how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Chemical concentrations combined with stream flow provides data on stream-water element flux for each watershed.

Water samples and data collected by scientists over a 16-week period from all nine watersheds hang on the walls CLIMA.

Nine sets of “Water Paintings” hang from the ceiling. Cortada created each using the same water scientists study. He placed watercolor paper in mesh and tied it to a rope in each of the nine weirs. The works depict 4 months of streamflow.

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.
History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

 

 

 

About the artist:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

 

Film Screening: Battleground Everglades | Dangerous Seas

 

 

Please join us for the special screening of “Dangerous Seas” on Wednesday, January 24th at 7PM at the Deering Estate in Miami.  The episode of DANGEROUS SEAS showcases Florida artist Xavier Cortada using his own creativity to inspire environmental restoration.

This event is open to the public and is RSVP only.  Click here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/premiere-battleground-everglades-at-the-deering-estate-tickets-41877591002?aff=efbeventtix  (EVENT CLOSED/Sold out)

 

DESCRIPTION

As part of the Speaking Sustainably Film Series, South Florida PBS (WPBT2 – WXEL) and the Deering Estate invite you to a complimentary reception and screening of the Battleground Everglades, Dangerous Seas, on January 24th at 7pm at the Deering Estate Visitor Center Theatre. Reception begins at 7pm with light snacks and beverages. The screening will begin at 7:30pm. Following the screening guests can participate in a Q&A with featured experts and the production crew. Event is free and open to the public.

BATTLEGROUND EVERGLADES explores the struggle to save one of the world’s most revered wetlands: Florida’s Everglades. Devastated by a century of drainage and development, the entire Everglades watershed is suffering from man-made pollution, habitat destruction and species decline.

Hosted by Charles Kropke, author and well-known Everglades expert, the 6-part series showcases dramatic challenges and innovative solutions to restore this World Heritage Site. As more and more countries battle sea level rise, invasive species, algae outbreaks and other environmental issues, the Everglades is poised to become a beacon of learning and hope.

“DANGEROUS SEAS” EPISODE:

South Florida is at the epicenter of a world-wide threat from sea level rise. DANGEROUS SEAS examines how Florida’s porous Biscayne aquifer, the source of South Florida’s drinking water, is endangered by rising oceans and other contaminates.

The program also journeys to a remote Florida Bay mud flat, to discover how sea level rise contributes to dwindling bird nesting populations. In Everglades National Park, audiences can watch scientists studying how sea level rise is affecting critical peat soil, a building block for Florida’s storm-vulnerable coasts. DANGEROUS SEAS also showcases a well-known Florida artist using his own creativity to inspire environmental restoration.

The series will begin airing on both South Florida PBS stations in February 2018, See below airdate schedule! 

WPBT :

101 – Algea  Explosion – Wednesday, February 7th,  7:30 PM

102 – War on Invasive Species – Wednesday, February 14, 7:30 PM

103 – The Battle Over Big Water – Wednesday, February 21, 7:30 PM

104 – Dangerous Seas – Wednesday, February 28, 7:30 PM

105 – Survival at Stake – Wednesday, March 7, 7:30 PM

106 – Glades Warriors – Wednesday, March 14, 7:30 PM

 

WXEL :

101 – Algea  Explosion – Thursday, February 8th, 8 PM

102 – War on Invasive Species – Thursday, February 25,  8 PM

103 – The Battle Over Big Water – Thursday, February 22, 8 PM

104 – Dangerous Seas – Thursday, March 1, 8 PM

105 – Survival at Stake – Thursday, March 8, 8 PM

106 – Glades Warriors – Thursday, March 15, 8 PM

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450” exhibit

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada
will be exhibiting his Native Flags project (www.nativeflags.org)
and his 2015 work, 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas.
at

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450”

An international symposium and curated exhibit focused on the intersection of science and art.
Exhibit & Special Event on Saturday, April 22, 2017
3:30 pm -10:00 pm; Free and open to the public
Exhibit on display from April 9 – June 26, 2017

 

HIT IT: Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it!,” video screen shot, 2015.
In acknowledgement of the support from the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

 

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it! | Burn it! | Eat it! | Freeze itBury it! video documentation of performance, 2015
Xavier Cortada

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas was created by Xavier Cortada during April-May 2015 during an artist residency at the Rising Seas Confab 2015, Rauschenberg Studio, Captiva, Florida. In this performance, Cortada comments with irony on the weak to non-existent actions being taken to address both the causes and the imminent realities of climate disruption in a State clearly at the epicenter of potential disaster—one which has been caused by inadequate action globally on soaring levels of greenhouse gases related to human activity.

Cortada has long been involved in art that intervenes in, and/or comments upon environmental problems. He has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Poleand direct-impact ecological art projects, in Florida, around the US, and internationally, (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland).

Xavier Cortada is Florida-educated and has lived in Miami since he was three. He is currently Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Science & Education and the College of Communication, Architecture + the Arts. (http://www.cortada.com)

 

ABOUT DEERING ESTATE:

The Deering Estate offers complimentary exhibit evenings, highlighting a variety of contemporary, historic, and visiting exhibitions inside the historic homes. Exhibit Evenings are free of charge and offer the public a chance to interact with artists and curators and to experience a variety of exhibit tours and talks. Exhibit Evenings are held from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, unless otherwise noted. Exhibit on view daily, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Free with Estate Admission.

A Sea Change (Mary Ann Wolfe Theatre)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.

A Sea Change (Wertheim Performing Arts Center)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.