CLIMA: An annual exhibit addressing Global Climate Change and Sea Level Rise


CLIMA Home | Main 2017Main 2016 | Main 2015

 

You are cordially invited to the opening of

CLIMA

an exhibit addressing Global Climate Change and Sea Level Rise
on Thursday, March 29th, 2018  from 6 pm to 9 pm.

at

The Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

 

CLIMA features the work of artists

John Bailly

Xavier Cortada

Michael Gray 

and

Gretchen Scharnagl

plus interactive works developed by

FIU School of Communication + Journalism and Code for Miami

 

 

Gretchen Scharnagl, “Ate Grapefruit,” 2015

 

 

 

 

Join us on Thursday, March 29th 2017 at 6pm at the Hibiscus Gallery in Pinecrest Gardens for the opening of CLIMA, an exhibit addressing Global Climate Change and Sea Level Rise. This third-annual show features the work of artists John Bailly, Xavier Cortada, Michael Gray, and Gretchen Scharnagl. The exhibit will also feature interactive works developed by the FIU School of Communication + Journalism and Code for Miami to address sea level rise- including “Will it Flood?,” a new flood prediction app: type in your address! See when the high tides will affect your neighborhood!

The CLIMA exhibit is presented in partnership with Florida International University College of Arts & Sciences School of Environment, Society and the Arts (SEAS), the FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA), the FIU Honors College (Honors) and the FIU Sea Level Solutions Center (SLSC).



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CLIMA Home | Main 2017Main 2016 | Main 2015

CLIMA 2016 featured Cortada’s “DO NOT OPEN”

Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.


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CLIMA Home | Main 2017Main 2016 | Main 2015

CLIMA 2015 featured Cortada’s “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas”

Xavier Cortada, "Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: FREEZE IT!," video sreen shot, 2015. In acknowledgement of the support of the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: FREEZE IT!,” video screen shot, 2015. In acknowledgment of the support of the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

 

“Water Paintings,” a solo exhibition of works created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

“Water Paintings”

a solo exhibition of works
created at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
by


Xavier Cortada

at

Hibiscus Gallery
Pinecrest Gardens
11000 S. Red Road
Pinecrest, FL 33156

Exhibit runs from March 26th through April 29th, 2018

WATER PAINTINGS

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Xavier Cortada works with Hydrologist Mark Green to create “Water Paintings” at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

 

Water Paintings allowed me to give water at Hubbard Brook’s nine watersheds a voice.  In the work, I made water the protagonist.  In June 2016, I placed nine pencil drawings and nine pieces of watercolor paper inside nylon mesh.  I then tied the mesh bags to a rope at each of the nine weirs at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and left them there for a period of 16 weeks in 2016.  The water flowing through the mesh stained the paper inside.  Water samples and water data were collected by scientists over the same 16-week period from the same nine weirs.  The final work included water samples, data, even the residue in filters.  I wanted audiences to see the water, what the water did, and what it painted as it flowed and transported materials down the stream.”

Xavier Cortada

 

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Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

Xavier Cortada, “Water Paintings: Hubbard Brook,” paper and residue captured from water flowing from each of the 9 weirs at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest LTER in New Hampshire, 2016

 

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Small first-order watersheds can show us how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Chemical concentrations combined with stream flow provides data on stream-water element flux for each watershed.

Water samples and data collected by scientists over a 16-week period from all nine watersheds hang on the walls CLIMA.

Nine sets of “Water Paintings” hang from the ceiling. Cortada created each using the same water scientists study. He placed watercolor paper in mesh and tied it to a rope in each of the nine weirs. The works depict 4 months of streamflow.

 

About the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems. It has produced some of the most extensive and longest continuous data bases on the hydrology, biology, geology and chemistry of a forest and its associated aquatic ecosystems.

Hubbard Brook scientists pioneered the small watershed approach, which transformed the study of forests by using whole watersheds as living laboratories. This ground-breaking approach fostered many new discoveries beneficial to both science and society.

Hubbard Brook scientists discovered acid rain in North America by taking meticulous, long-term measurements of rain and snow. Scientists continue to document acid rain’s damaging effects and track recovery linked to pollution reduction efforts.

Learn more at http://www.hubbardbrook.org

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

 

https://lternet.edu/sites/hbr

Overview: The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is a 3,160 hectare reserve located in the White Mountain National Forest operated by the USDA Forest Service, near Woodstock, New Hampshire. The on-site research program is dedicated to the long-term study of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems.
History: The HBEF was established by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in 1955 as a major center for hydrologic research in New England. In the early 1960’s, Dr. F. Herbert Bormann and others proposed the use of small watersheds to study element cycling. In 1963, the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) was initiated by Bormann and Drs. Gene E. Likens and Noye M. Johnson, then on the faculty of Dartmouth College, and Dr. Robert S. Pierce of the USDA Forest Service. They proposed to use the small watershed approach at Hubbard Brook to study linkages between hydrologic and nutrient flux and cycling in response to natural and human disturbances, such as air pollution, forest cutting, land-use changes, increases in insect populations and climatic factors.Research Topics: Vegetation structure and production; dynamics of detritus in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; atmosphere-terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem linkages; heterotroph population dynamics; effects of human activities on ecosystems.

Special thanks to the entire Hubbard Brook team, the USDA Forest Service, Dr. Lindsey Rustad, Hydrologist Mark Green, Sr. Researcher Tammy Wooster, Amey Bailey, and Mary Martin.

 

 

 

About the artist:

 

Xavier Cortada:

Xavier Cortada serves as Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society and the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts.

Cortada often engages scientists in his art-making: At CERN, Cortada and a particle physicist created a permanent digital-art piece to celebrate the Higgs boson discovery. Cortada has worked with scientists at Hubbard Brook LTER on a water cycle visualization project driven by real-time data collected at a watershed in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

He has collaborated with a population geneticist to explore our ancestral journeys out of Africa 60,000-years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesize a DNA strand from a sequence 400 museum visitors randomly generated, and with botanists to develop multi-year participatory eco-art eff orts to reforest mangrovesnative trees and wildflowers across Florida.

The Miami artist has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Pole) and eco-art (TaiwanHawaii and Hollandprojects, and painted community murals addressing peace (Cyprus and Northern Ireland), child welfare  (Bolivia and Panama), AIDS (Switzerland and South Africa) and juvenile justice (Miami and Philadelphia) concerns.

 

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450” exhibit

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada
will be exhibiting his Native Flags project (www.nativeflags.org)
and his 2015 work, 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas.
at

DEERING SPRING CONTEMPORARY “PLATFORM 450”

An international symposium and curated exhibit focused on the intersection of science and art.
Exhibit & Special Event on Saturday, April 22, 2017
3:30 pm -10:00 pm; Free and open to the public
Exhibit on display from April 9 – June 26, 2017

 

HIT IT: Xavier Cortada, “Five Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it!,” video screen shot, 2015.
In acknowledgement of the support from the Rauschenberg Residency/Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

 

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas: Hit it! | Burn it! | Eat it! | Freeze itBury it! video documentation of performance, 2015
Xavier Cortada

5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas was created by Xavier Cortada during April-May 2015 during an artist residency at the Rising Seas Confab 2015, Rauschenberg Studio, Captiva, Florida. In this performance, Cortada comments with irony on the weak to non-existent actions being taken to address both the causes and the imminent realities of climate disruption in a State clearly at the epicenter of potential disaster—one which has been caused by inadequate action globally on soaring levels of greenhouse gases related to human activity.

Cortada has long been involved in art that intervenes in, and/or comments upon environmental problems. He has created environmental installations (North Pole and South Poleand direct-impact ecological art projects, in Florida, around the US, and internationally, (Taiwan, Hawaii and Holland).

Xavier Cortada is Florida-educated and has lived in Miami since he was three. He is currently Artist-in-Residence at FIU School of Environment, Arts and Society | College of Arts, Science & Education and the College of Communication, Architecture + the Arts. (http://www.cortada.com)

 

ABOUT DEERING ESTATE:

The Deering Estate offers complimentary exhibit evenings, highlighting a variety of contemporary, historic, and visiting exhibitions inside the historic homes. Exhibit Evenings are free of charge and offer the public a chance to interact with artists and curators and to experience a variety of exhibit tours and talks. Exhibit Evenings are held from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, unless otherwise noted. Exhibit on view daily, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Free with Estate Admission.

A Sea Change (Mary Ann Wolfe Theatre)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.

A Sea Change (Wertheim Performing Arts Center)

 

Multidisciplinary program to raise awareness on climate change


By Ivan Lopez

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers predicts sea levels in South Florida will rise from three to seven inches by the year 2030 and from nine to 24 inches by the year 2060. A rise of that magnitude would put close to 30 percent of South Florida underwater, completely transforming our city in ways we cannot fully comprehend.

FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts (CARTA) is bringing together dozens of faculty members and students from many different disciplines – theatre, dance, music, journalism, architecture, environmental science – to produce A Sea Change: a Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration in Response to a Global Threat. The 90 minute program will feature a lot of important research and facts presented in creative and impactful ways.

Phillip M. Church, associate professor of theatre, conceived and directed the evening. Church has spent much of his professional career creating art and theatre that speaks to important social issues.

“There is no greater threat to our survival right now than climate change,” he said.  “FIU has been researching and raising awareness about climate change and sea level rise for well over a decade. We are at a point, however, where all of that research needs to transform into tangible action. That requires all of us, not just the scientists and policy makers. A ‘sea change’ is needed in our collective thinking about this issue.”

Robert E. Gutsche Jr., assistant professor of journalism and media, produced the evening.

“My hope is that this project takes people beyond awareness, even beyond expertise of specific areas of climate change. We need to find ways to engage knowledge with action. It’s not enough for people to know about an issue. We have to decide to do something about our problems.”

Renowned environmental artist Xavier Cortada will present an immersive interactive piece; FIU Professor of Music Orlando Garcia composed music especially for the event; and Adjunct Lecturer of Dance Crystal Patient choreographed some dance numbers.

Joel Murray, chair and professor of theatre, wrote a short play titled Good that addresses the impact art can have on social change.

“If it is strong enough, art can change the way people think. The real question though is does that change transform into action. Will it make the audience participate, roll up their sleeves and demand change.”

Other FIU Theatre artists participating in the event include Associate Professor Wayne E. Robinson, Jr., alumni Evelyn Perez, Zack Myers, Caitlyn Lincoln, Pia Vicioso-Vila and current student Sigrid Corvo.

A Sea Change is part of CARTA’s larger Climate Change Initiative, which aspires through teaching, research, engagement and creative work to position the college as a global thought leader in climate change information, adaptation, mitigation and resilience.

“Preparing for climate resilience is among the critical imperatives of our times, and our college is particularly well-positioned to address it,” said Marilys Nepomechie, associate dean and professor of architecture. “Climate change is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. One that can only be addressed successfully by involving many areas of expertise. This collaboration between multiple college departments is, in fact, absolutely perfect.”

A Sea Change will be shown on both campuses. On April 4, it will be performed at the Wertheim Performing Arts Center at Modesto A. Maidique Campus and on April 7 at the Mary Anne Wolfe Theatre at Biscayne Bay Campus. Both performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Space is limited.  To make a reservation, call 305-348-0496. You can find more information about the event at eyesontherise.org/aseachange.

Alaska Residency: University of Alaska Fairbanks (cancelled)


 

arctic-ak

 

FIU SEAS and CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada will travel to Alaska to engage in research for his EVER/PERMA project addressing sea-level rise and global climate change concerns.  This is part of his science art practice conducted in partnership with FIU SEAS and FCE LTER faculty (and now with faculty in the  University of Alaska in Fairbanks).

Here’s a blurb about the Ever/Perma research effort:

Ever/Perma is a new body of work being developed by Xavier Cortada.  In it, he uses art to engage community members in addressing environmental degradation, global climate change, and sea level rise concerns. He does so chiefly through the development and implementation of participatory ecological art projects, site-specific artistic interventions in Alaska and Florida, and a programmed exhibit at the project’s conclusion. During the project, Cortada will also convene community meetings, work groups, discussion panels and lectures to activate ideas.
Specifically, “Ever/Perma” will address how global climate change is disrupting the ecosystems at both ends of our country:  sea level rise threatens the Everglades; warmer temperatures are thawing the Arctic permafrost.  Scientists tell us that as both of these ecosystems are degraded by human impacts they release methane (20x more potent than carbon dioxide) into the atmosphere and further disrupt our global climate.

Now more than ever, scientists and artists play a critical role: Scientists must continue to record how the climate responds to changing policies. Artists need to use art to effectuate change; to capture this moment.

“Now More Than Ever” Science Art Talk at Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, FL

Xavier Cortada, “Now More than Ever” digital art*, 2016.

FIU Artist-in-Residence Xavier Cortada will be the third-Thursday speaker at the Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, FL on the February 16th, 2017.  He will give his science art talk during an exhibit featuring the work of Deep-sea explorer and MacArthur Award Winner, Dr. Edie Widder.  “Now more than ever scientists and artists play a critical role: Scientists must continue to record how the climate responds to changing policies. Artists need to use art to effectuate change; to capture this moment,” said Cortada.

ILLUMINATING THE DEEP: The Fine Art of Exploration

Explore.  Learn.  Act.

Deep-sea explorer and MacArthur Award Winner, Dr. Edie Widder, collaborated with artist and inventor, Dr. Steve Bernstein, to create this blockbuster exhibition filled with astonishing digitally enhanced photos of living creatures that sparkle and glow and flash with light from within.  Combined with the original artwork of Else Bostlemann, from Dr. William Beebe’s historic National Geographic bathysphere expeditions of the 1930s, this is a show of epic proportions.  Compare yourself to the life-size giant squid (first photographed by Dr. Widder) or paint with light in virtual reality, you can immerse yourself in the wonders of our planet’s last frontier. Plan your group tour now and be sure to download a copy of our featured article in Oceanography magazine written by Dr. Widder:

http://www.tos.org/oceanography/assets/docs/29-4_widder.pdf

Exhibition Dates:  December 22, 2016 – March 4, 2017

No charge for members, non-members $10

Read article Edie wrote for Oceanography magazine:

Climate Wrongs and Human Rights (University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium)

2017 Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review‘s 2017 Symposium, Climate Wrongs and Human Rights, has been announced. Scholarship from this annual event will be featured in the symposium issue to be published in the Volume 72, Winter Edition.

Student / General Public Registration – here

CLE Registration (8 credits available) – here

Friday, February 10, 2017

Saturday, February 11, 2017

University of Miami Storer Auditorium

5250 University Drive, Coral Gables, Florida 33146


About the Symposium

The University of Miami Law Review’s Symposium is an annual event that leads to the publication of an issue. This year’s Symposium, entitled “Climate Wrongs and Human Rights” will explore the human rights implications of climate change. Panelists will examine this topic through a variety of subjects, including democracy, federalism, immigration, and philosophy. The Symposium will also feature art by Miami Arist and UM Law Alum, Xavier Cortada.

Keynote Speaker 
Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe
Featured Artist 
Cortada will provide opening remarks on Saturday, February 11 and invite the audience to participate in his performative art project, titled “Do Not Open.” 

Panel I—Ground Zero: Miami

What does climate change mean for the City of Miami? This panel will provide a comparative analysis of adaptation measures amongst different parts of the city and will examine the disparate impact of climate change in Miami. This panel will explore if and how law and policy is mitigating the pressing effects of climate change in South Florida.

Panelists:

Abigail CorbettShareholder, Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A. 
Benjamin KirtmanProfessor, University of Miami Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science 
Elizabeth WheatonEnvironment and Sustainability Director, City of Miami Beach

Moderator: Catherine KaimanLecturer in Law, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel II—Climate Democracy 

Can democracy adequately address climate change and its human rights implications? This panel will explore how political and legal institutions must adapt to the ongoing crisis of climate change to effectuate meaningful solutions.

Panelists: 

Rebecca BratspiesProfessor of Law, The City University of New York School of Law
Dale JamiesonProfessor, New York University School of Law 
Alice KaswanProfessor, University of San Francisco School of Law 

Moderator: Felix MormannAssociate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law

Panel III—Climate Refugees 

Is the displacement of climate refugees a humanitarian concern? This panel will discuss the link between climate change and human migration. It will explore if and how immigration law and policy should evolve to address climate refugees.

Panelists: 

Sumudu AtapattuSenior Lecturer, University of Wisconsin Law School 
Michael GerrardProfessor, Columbia Law School 
Katrina WymanProfessor of Law, New York University School of Law 

Moderator: Roxana BaconVisiting Professor, University of Miami School of Law 

Panel IV—Climate Philosophy 

Is the right to a clean environment a human right? Do we have a duty to the next generation? We invite the audience to consider these questions as the panelists focus on the moral obligations individuals have in addressing climate change and in ameliorating the human rights implications of climate change. This panel will inquire as to the gaps in urgency between policy makers and scientists.

Panelists: 

Stephen GardinerProfessor, University of Washington 
Naomi OreskesProfessor, Harvard University 
Jacqueline PattersonDirector, Environmental and Climate Justice Program, NAACP

Moderator: James Nickel, Professor, University of Miami School of Law

 


A printable version of the tentative schedule is forthcoming. However, the tentative schedule can be found listed below:

Friday, February 10, 2017

1:00 p.m. – 1: 30 p.m.        Registration

1:30 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.         Welcome

1:35 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.         Introduction of Keynote

1:50 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.           Keynote: Chief Albert Naquin, Traditional Chief, Isle de Jean    Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe

2:30 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.            Break

2:50 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.             Panel I – Ground Zero: Miami

4:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.             Break

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.              Panel II- Climate Democracy

Saturday, February 11, 2017

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.              Registration

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.              Welcome

9:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.            Panel III—Climate Refugees

11:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.          Break

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.            Panel IV – Climate Philosophy

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.              Closing

Cortada will participate in CLEO Panel Discussion during the Miami-Dade STEAM Expo

FIU SEAS & CARTA artist-in-residence Xavier Cortada will participate in CLEO Panel Discussion during the Miami-Dade STEAM Expo.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools – STEAM

Our Vision

Miami-Dade County Public Schools aspires to engage and prepare all our students in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics (STEAM) to ensure our community has the next generation of inventors, explorers, innovators, artists and leaders..

Our Mission

The mission of Miami-Dade County Public Schools STEAM is to leverage the expertise and capital of the Department of Career and Technical Education, the Department of Mathematics and Science and the Department of Visual and Performing Arts to increase student achievement in STEAM curriculum to promote career and college readiness.

Learn more at http://stem.dadeschools.net

 

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy presents “DO NOT OPEN” performance

 

Contact: Jennifer Rennicks, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Alissa@cleanenergy.org, 954-734-3773

 

ADVISORY: Miami Community Leaders, Elected Officials, and Artist, Join in Interactive Art Installation

to Highlight Sea Level Rise and Uncertain Future of South Florida

Event emphasizes climate action uncertainty as President-Elect Trump is inaugurated

 

Miami, Fla. – One day before the inauguration of climate change denier President-Elect Trump, Miami-based and globally featured artist Xavier Cortada will host a live performance as a portion of his ongoing research driven art, CLIMA 2016. The interactive exhibit “Do Not Open” invites participants to imagine the future of South Florida, its communities, and the effects of sea level rise, writing letters to future Floridians placed in a time capsule. 

When: January 19th at 7:00 PM

Where: Cortada Art Studio Gallery, 4664 SW 75th Avenue, Miami, FL 33155

Who:

  • Xavier Cortada
  • Elected Officials
  • Community Leaders
  • South Florida Residents

What: The event, through art, will draw attention to the challenge of climate change impacts to South Florida and the need for more action now. This is an especially critical and timely message as the event is being held only one day before the inauguration of a new president who vocally denies climate change and its effects already being felt by communities throughout the world. The Do Not Open art installation is a time capsule to capture written messages/letters that will be added to the exhibit by Xavier Cortada. The performance also coincides with the full gallery opening featuring a series of ceramic and tile works.

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Xavier Cortada, “DO NOT OPEN,” 2016.

DO NOT OPEN:  Participant Instructions | Artist’s Poem

City of Sweetwater submerged beneath a 6 foot sea level rise.

Submerged: City of Sweetwater beneath a 6-foot rise in sea level (using the eyesontherise app).

 

  • Walk up to the “Do Not Open” wall in the exhibit.
  • Close your eyes: Imagine your city in the future. Imagine how rising seas will impact it and those who will live here then.
  • Think about what you would like them to know. Think about what you believe someone living in 2041, 2066, 2116 or 2216 will need to hear from someone living in 2016.
  • Unclip a blank piece of paper and envelope from the wall and use a pencil to write it all down:  Tell them who you are. Tell them why you are writing to them. Sign it. Date it.
  • Fold the letter in two, kiss it, place it in the envelope and seal it.
  • On the outside of the envelope write only one of these four phrases:

“DO NOT OPEN: 25 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 50 years”
“DO NOT OPEN: 100 years”
or
“DO NOT OPEN: 200 years”

  • Clip the sealed envelope to the “Do Not Open” wall with the words facing out.
  • Stare at your envelope for 25 seconds, 50 seconds, 100 seconds, or 200 seconds.
  • Think of how your words will be received in the future.
  • Walk away

Earlier Workshop with Seniors
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 at 10 am
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

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